From the air, the landscape of Texas' vast feedlots and oil fields is by turns bleak and surreal. Photographer Mishka Henner aimed to capture the contrasts and intense colors of these landscapes in a collection of work titled 'Feedlots.' By stitching together hundreds of satellite images, he created large, detailed prints documenting the dynamism of these locations - earth tones clashing with the violent greens and reds of feedlot waste.

Image by Mishka Henner.
Image by Mishka Henner.
Image by Mishka Henner.

'Feedlots' is entirely composed using satellite images which are freely available for public use. As such, Henner's work is part of a wider trend of 'curated' works created from public sources like Google Earth, Street View and 'found' images. Some such projects are curiosity-driven endeavors that explore the boundaries of these sources. Others, like Henner's work, are inspired in part by the accidental beauty of projects like the crowd-sourced Stratocam.

Even other photographers' works are fair game, as in Wired's tongue-in-cheek photo essay created from the massive Tokyo panorama we posted a few weeks ago. Work like this exists in an interesting space - one in which the concept of 'authorship' is fascinatingly elastic. What do you make of it? Let us know in the comments.