Best DSLRs and ILCs for less than $1000

Good-quality DSLRs and interchangeable lens cameras (ILCs) typically provide plenty of manual controls, comfortable ergonomics, and support a legacy of lenses for years to come. The fact that cameras like the Canon EOS 5D Mark II and Nikon D7000 are still so popular with enthusiasts, even after newer models have come along, speaks volumes.

Old or new, getting hold of a quality digital camera still requires you to put down a decent chunk of change. In this article we're going to look at ten of the best DSLRs and ILCs available for under $1,000. We've included current cameras that we really like, and last-generation bargains, too. If you're torn between certain models, we hope this guide will help. The 'more info' links go our product pages on dpreview, where you'll find information including detailed specs, sample galleries, user reviews and more, and 'buy now' will take you to amazon.comPrices are body-only, unless otherwise noted, and are correct at the time of writing.

Is there anything missing from the list? Have your say in the comments.

Panasonic Lumix DMC-GX1 | more info. | buy now

$479.95 with 14-42mm kit lens

The rangefinder-styled Panasonic Lumix DMC-GX1 is the most budget-friendly model on this list, available for a mere $250 for the body only. Even bundled with its 14-42mm kit lens, the GX1 is cheaper than many high end fixed-lens compacts. That's not too shabby for a camera touting a 16MP sensor, generous manual controls and full HD video. 

Key Specifications

  • 16MP Micro Four Thirds MOS sensor
  • ISO 160-12,800
  • 3.0", 460k dot touch screen LCD
  • Full AVCHD 1080/60i video (from 30fps sensor output)
  • 11fps burst depth in RAW
  • Continuous full resolution shooting at 4fps
  • Continuous shooting up to 20fps (at reduced resolution)
  • Orientation sensor (providing information with non-OIS lenses)
  • Electronic level gauge
  • Four available Fn buttons (two onscreen)
  • Built-in stereo microphones

One of the benefits of the GX1 is its compact size. Coupled with its stellar image quality, the camera is a dynamite companion for a pro looking for a lot of power in a small frame to keep in an accessible pocket at all times. The GX1 is also well-built and rugged, and is of course compatible with all Panasonic (and Olympus) Micro Four Thirds lenses. Another ergonomic benefit of the GX1 is the camera's touchscreen interface and rear-mounted command dial.

With a robust set of manual controls, as Panasonic has been known for, great image quality and solid, compact handling, the Panasonic Lumix DMC-GX1 is an amazing bargain right now, while stocks last.

Click here to read our review of the Panasonic Lumix DMC-GX1 (February 2012)

Canon EOS 60D | more info. | buy now

$899 with EF 18-135mm kit lens

The EOS 60D was announced in 2010, as Canon's update to the popular 50D. The 60D shares its 18 megapixel sensor with several Rebel models (including the new Rebel T5i/EOS 700D), housing it in a compact body with flip-out LCD screen. The 60D features a similar movie mode to that of the EOS 7D, and sits just beneath it in Canon's DSLR lineup, targeting the upper echelon of consumer DLSR shooters.

Key Specifications

  • 18MP APS-C CMOS sensor
  • ISO 100-6400 (expandable to 12,800)
  • 5.3 fps continuous shooting
  • Fully articulated 3.0" screen with 1.04 million dots
  • 1080p HD video recording with manual controls
  • SD / SDHC / SDXC storage
  • In-camera raw development

At the time it was released, the 60D won the megapixel war with the D7000, flaunting an 18 megapixel sensor, while Nikon went with 16 megapixels. Image quality from the 60D is great, with a very good low light performance at high ISO levels. The camera's 1080/720p video mode offers a range of frame rates and control over exposure, and overall, video is one of the 60D's major strengths.

Ergonomics are quite impressive as well, courtesy of the articulated LCD screen, comfortable grip, dual command dials, and convenient Q menu for quick adjustments. At its current street price of $600, the 60D is a steal. 

Click here to read our review of the Canon EOS 60D (November 2010)

Sony SLT-A65 | more info. | buy now

$748.00 with 18-55mm kit lens

The Sony SLT-A65 is a model that simply cannot be overlooked in this price range, and the fact that it can be had for around $700 with a kit lens is pretty amazing. The A65's 
mirror is translucent, allowing light to spill through to the imaging sensor with the remainder of it being transferred to the phase-detection AF sensor. Because of this, the camera is able to achieve lightening quick full-time AF operation, including full-time AF in video mode.

Key Specifications

  • 24.3MP APS-C CMOS Sensor
  • 2nd-generation Translucent Mirror Technology
  • 2.4 million dot OLED electronic viewfinder
  • 3-inch TFT Xtra Fine tilting LCD (921,600 pixels) with TruBlack technology
  • ISO range of 100-16,000
  • 15 points (3 cross-type) AF
  • 10fps continuous shooting
  • 1,200-zone exposure metering
  • SteadyShot INSIDE image stabilization
  • AVCHD 60p/60i/24p video recording

Autofocus isn't the only strength of the A65. The camera has a brilliant 2.4-million-dot OLED electronic viewfinder. This is another feature that steers it away from tradition. The A65's LCD screen flips downward and can be rotated, and features a 921,000-pixel resolution. The A65 also excels with a 10fps continuous image capture ability, which blows the competition out of the water when it comes to rapid shooting.

Also worth noting is the A65's  60p HD video feature. 60p means more fluid movement in footage, and is the framerate of choice for televised sports. The A65 also has Sony's in-body SteadyShot image stabilization system to reduce blur and smooth out videos, and includes sweep panorama and built-in HDR modes. Last but not least, the A65 is still one of the megapixel leaders with a 24-megapixel sensor that produces great RAW images.

Click here to read our review of the Sony Alpha SLT-A65 (November 2011)

Pentax K-5 | more info. | buy now

$799.00 with 18-55mm kit lens

The Pentax K-5 a couple of years old but it still brings a lot to the table. It's one of the best APS-C DSLRs in terms of high ISO image quality and low shadow noise at low ISOs. The K-5 has 1080P HD video recording with external microphone support and triple-axis shake reduction. Continuous shooting can reach 7fps, which bests the camera's Canon and Nikon competitors. Pentax is definitely one of the 'cult' brands of the camera world - those who have shot with one are diehards until the end. 

Key Specifications

  • 16.3MP APS-C CMOS sensor
  • ISO sensitivity span of 80-51,200
  • Triple-axis sensor-based shake reduction (horizontal, vertical and rotational correction)
  • SAFOX IX+ 11-point AF system (improved over the K-7)
  • 3in, 921k pixel LCD screen
  • 100% viewfinder coverage (0.92x magnification)
  • Choice of PEF or DNG RAW files
  • Improved handheld HDR function (JPEG mode only)
  • Continuous shooting up to 7fps
  • 1080p HD movie mode
  • Limited in-camera movie editing functionality
  • Socket for external microphone input

The Pentax K-5 is a bit smaller than the 60D and D7000, but it sports one of the most comfortable and ergonomic body designs on the market. It's also exceptionally rigid, courtesy of its rugged magnesium-alloy body, and its weatherproof, as well. One of the features I like most about Pentax cameras in general is their plethora of digital filters and image effects. Even though this can be achieved in Photoshop, it's nice to know that the camera offers the capability, and that the original image can be retained. The K-5 has the most advanced in-camera creative suite in its class.

Other strengths include the camera's speedy autofocus system and unique menu structure. At $800 with a kit lens, the Pentax K-5 is one of the best choices on this list. Its sucessor, the K-5II offers superior autofocus and a handful of other minor improvements, but the K-5 is still a great camera at a very good price.

Click here to read our review of the Pentax K-5 (December 2010)

Nikon D5200 | more info. | buy now 

$796.95 with 18-55mm kit lens

The Nikon D5200 replaces the D5100, a camera that was very popular among amateur photographers and videographers for its impressive image quality and friendly price point. Part of the allure of the D5100 was the fact that it featured the same 16MP sensor with the more advanced D7000. The D5200 continues in this tradition, borrowing the 24MP sensor from the higher-end D7100 (without the no-AA filter trick) at a lower price-point. 

Key Specifications

  • 24.1MP DX-format CMOS sensor
  • EXPEED 3 processing
  • ISO 100-6400 standard, up to 25600 expanded
  • 5 fps continuous shooting
  • 39-point AF system, 9 sensors cross-type
  • 2016 pixel RGB metering sensor
  • 1080p30 video recording, built-in stereo mic
  • 921k dot 3" vari-angle LCD monitor

The D5200 excels in low ISO RAW and JPEG capture, and exhibits minimal noise at high ISOs. In terms of high ISO shooting, the D5200 is up there with the best of its competition. Other highlights include the camera's 39-point AF coverage, in-camera RAW processing a, 3-inch, 921,000 pixel articulated LCD screen, and accurate auto white balance performance across a multitude of environments.

Video mode is also improved with manual audio level control and the ability to output uncompressed HD video to an external recorder. In other respects the D5200 offers similar specifications as the D7000. These include the 9 cross-type AF sensors and 2016 pixel RGB color-sensitive metering sensor.

Click here to read our review of the Nikon D5200 (May 2013)

Canon EOS Rebel T4i | more info. | buy now

$799.95 with 18-55mm kit lens

The T4i is the shortest-lived Rebel in history - it was replaced by the T5i after being on the market for just nine months. The good news is that the T5i brings almost nothing new to the table, aside from three very minor tweaks (new body texture, real-time Creative Filter preview, and a mode dial that can rotate 360 degrees). The T4i is unofficially discontinued but as long as stocks last you can find it for $100 less than the new T5i, and you get basically the same camera.

Key Specifications

  • 18MP APS-C 'Hybrid CMOS' sensor
  • 14-bit DIGIC 5 processor
  • ISO 100-12800 standard, 25600 expanded
  • 9 point AF system, all sensors cross type, central sensor F2.8
  • 63 zone iFCL metering
  • 5 fps continuous shooting
  • Phase detection AF from imaging sensor for Live View and Video
  • Continuous autofocus in movie mode with subject tracking
  • 1080p30 video recording with built-in stereo microphone
  • 1.04m dot, 3" touch-sensitive vari-angle ClearView II LCD

The fact that the T4i can be had for $600 (body only) is pretty great, considering the fact that this is a camera that was only released last fall. The older EOS Rebel T3i (which continues in Canon's lineup) is now only $600 with a kit lens. There are no major differences in terms of quality between the T4i, T3i, and even the T2i - I chose the T4i for this article simply because of its superior video functionality.

With an STM lens, the T4i offers nearly silent autofocus in live view mode, a feature shooters have been asking for for years. That said, the T4i's AF system in Live View is slow at times, but I prefer that over a loud, jerky performance. The T4i offers good image quality and an easy-to-use touch screen interface that enables touch focus and other forms of touch functionality. Compared to the Nikon D5200, the T4i has slightly lower resolution, but this makes little difference in the real world.

Click here to read our review of the Canon EOS Rebel T4i/650D (August 2012)

Panasonic Lumix DMC-G6 | more info. | buy now*

$749.95 with 14-42mm II kit lens

The Lumix G series has always been a favorite of ours, particularly for the robust manual controls, impressive image quality, and advanced video modes. Over time, the G-series has split into four branches - entry-level 'GF' models, rangefinder style GX cameras, high-end GH-series and the mid-range plain old 'G's. The recently-announced G6 replaces last year's G5 and sits above the GF6 and below the GH3 in Panasonic's G-series lineup. 

Key Specifications

  • 16MP Micro Four Thirds MOS sensor
  • ISO 160-12,800 (extendable up to 25,600)
  • 3.0", 1.04 million dot touchscreen LCD
  • 1.44 million dot OLED electronic viewfinder with eye sensor
  • Full AVCHD 1080/60p video with full manual control (and 2.4X digital teleconverter option)
  • 3.5mm external mic socket
  • 7 frames per second continuous shooting, 5 fps with AF-tracking
  • 23 Scene modes including 'Cute Dessert' and 'Sweet Child's Face'
  • iAuto mode can automatically detect when to use 9 scene modes

Panasonic has introduced some standout new features with the G6, one of the most interesting being NFC connectivity. This means files can be transferred by simply tapping a smartphone to the camera, or live 30p HD video can be streamed to a tablet or other capable device. The G6 inherits the GH2's 16-megapixel Live MOS sensor and has the ability to shoot up to 12,800 native ISO, with expandability to 25,600. A 1.44 million dot OLED EVF makes its way onto the G6 as well, and on the back is a fully articulating 3-inch LCD display with a 1.04 million dot resolution and touch-sensitivity.

Focus Peaking, 7fps continuous shooting, and a 1728-zone multi-pattern metering system all add to the G6's bag of tricks. As far as video functions are concerned, 1080/60p recording is nice to see, as well as a stop motion feature. 

Click here to read our peview of the Panasonic Lumix DMC-G6 (April 2013)

Sony NEX-6 | more info. | buy now

$898.00 with 16-50mm Power Zoom kit lens 

It's a struggle to find any major flaws with the 16MP Sony NEX-6. The camera packs in a lot of impressive technology, some of which is inherited from the flagship NEX-7, but it can be found for well under a grand. 

Key Specifications

  • 16.1MP APS-C format CMOS sensor
  • 2.3 million dot resolution OLED EVF
  • ISO 100-25600
  • Control dial
  • Customizable Fn button
  • 'Quick Navi' interactive settings display
  • Built-in Wi-Fi for connection to smartphones or computers, for photo sharing
  • Proprietary in-camera apps
  • Built-in flash (GN 6, ISO 100)
  • Electronic first-curtain shutter
  • 1080/60p HD movies in AVCHD (50p on PAL region models)

One of the major features that sets the NEX-6 apart from its peers is its 2.3 million dot resolution OLED EVF, which not only offers a brilliant picture, but does away with the need for an accessory port and of course the need to spend extra cash on an aftermarket viewfinder. This frees the hotshoe up for other accessories, such as external microphones for video recording, or a more powerful flashgun. The NEX-6 also offers more external manual control with the help of two control dials, and its protruding rubberized grip is nice and comfortable despite the small size of the camera. 

Built-in Wi-Fi is also a feature on the NEX-6, allowing users to connect smartphones and computers to the camera, and the NEX-6 can even be controlled remotely via a smartphone application. Additional features can be added to the NEX-6 via the Sony PlayMemories Store (which is accessible from the camera itself). The camera's Hybrid AF system works very well, and its AF in general is snappy and accurate. Other key selling points include 1080/60p HD video recording with exposure control and continuous AF, an articulating 920K LCD display, and very good image quality. Auto HDR, focus peaking, Sweep Panorama, and Hand-held Twilight / Anti Motion Blur all increase the appeal of the NEX-6 even further, making it a great bargain at its current street price.  

Click here to read our review of the Sony Alpha NEX-6 (March 2013)

Nikon D7000 | more info. | buy now 

$996.95 with with 18-105mm kit lens

The good thing about ever-expanding technology in the photo world is that gems like the Nikon D7000 reach sub-$1,000 price points only a couple of years after they're released. Announced in 2010 the D7000 has proven one of the most popular enthusiast DSLRs of the past few years, and remains highly sought-after even after the arrival of the D7100 in 2012. 

Key Specifications

  • 16.2MP DX-format CMOS sensor
  • ISO 100-6400 (plus H1 and H2 equivalent to ISO 12,800/25,600)
  • 39-point AF system with 3D tracking
  • New 2016 pixel metering sensor
  • 3.0 inch 921k dot LCD screen
  • 1080p HD video recording with mic jack for external microphone
  • Scene Recognition System aids WB/metering and focus accuracy
  • Twin SD card slots
  • New Live View/movie shooting switch
  • Full-time AF in Live View/movie modes
  • Up to 6fps continuous shooting
  • Lockable drive mode dial
  • Built-in intervalometer
  • Electronic level

The Nikon D7000 introduced 1080P HD video recording to Nikon's DSLR lineup, and also featured a 39-area (9 cross-type) TTL AF system with fine tuning (which has since been inherited by the D5200) as well as a 2016-pixel RGB metering sensor and a maximum ISO  sensitivity of 25,600. Six fps continuous shooting, a 100% coverage viewfinder, and dual SD card slots added to the appeal, as well.

The Nikon D7000 excels in build quality, RAW image quality, and high ISO noise performance, and is still one of the best midrange APS-C models you can buy. The D7000's 16MP resolution may seem low compared to the D7100's 24MP, but the difference isn't huge for most purposes, and right now, the D7000 is a bargain.

Click here to read our review of the Nikon D7000 (November 2010)

Olympus OM-D E-M5 | more info. | buy now

$1299 with 12-50mm kit lens

Olympus really knocked it out of the park with the release of the retro-styled OM-D E-M5 last year. Although the E-M5 shares many aesthetic similarities with its film-based predecessors, it's a completely different world on the inside. And a good one. 

Key Specifications

  • 16MP Micro Four Thirds MOS sensor
  • Weather-sealed body
  • Twin control dials
  • New, '5-axis' image stabilization
  • Shoot at up to ISO 25,600
  • Up to 9fps shooting (4.2 fps with continuous AF)
  • 1.44M dot electronic viewfinder
  • 3-inch articulated OLED touchscreen display
  • TruePic VI processor
  • Improved C-AF autofocus with 3D tracking
  • Flash sync speed up to 1/250th sec

Imagine taking every good feature from early Olympus Micro Four Thirds cameras, adding them together and then multiplying them by a substantial amount. That's the OM-D E-M5. It's one of our favorite cameras from the past couple of years. Olympus got it right with the camera's 16 megapixel MOS sensor, which produces stellar image quality. It can shoot up to 9fps continuously, reaches an ISO max of 25,600, and has a fantastic 1.44 million dot EVF with 100% coverage and 120fps refresh rate. The tilting 3-inch touchscreen OLED rear screen is nice to shoot with, and a flash sync speed of 1/250th of a second places the camera right up there with semi-pro DSLRs when it comes to flash photography. 

The OM-D has a lot in its toolkit, but perhaps the most impressive feature is its lightning-quick autofocus. Also, there are horizontal and vertical electronic levels on both the rear screen and viewfinder, five-axis image stabilization is built in, plus a live histogram, highlight/shadow grid adjustment for dynamic range improvement, oodles of white balance adjustments, and of course 11 Art filters that can cross-breed with one another. The OM-D E-M5's design benefits from dual command dials and comfortable weather sealed body, making the camera even more compelling.

Few mirrorless models can contend with the OM-D E-M5, and even though it's just under $1000 for the body only, the camera is worth every penny.

Click here to read our review of the Olympus OM-D EM-5 (April 2012)


Mike Perlman is a freelance photographer and writer, based in Bar Harbor, Maine. After a spell reviewing camcorders at Camcorderinfo.com, Mike moved to infoSync World as the Senior Photography Editor, before taking up a role at TechnoBuffalo.com as the head of the Photography department. These days, Mike runs his own photography business and contributes to dpreview between shoots.

The views and opinions expressed in this article are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions held by dpreview.com or any affiliated companies.

Comments

Total comments: 276
12
tecnoworld
By tecnoworld (10 months ago)

of course, none of the samsung nx cameras has been taken into consideration, in your article. They are all APS-C (20Mp), have a great IQ (top in class) and offer a lot of functions. Besides the NX lenses are among the best around.

The nx1000 is now a bargain, selling for less than 300$ with the kit lens.
The nx20 is again quite cheap for what it is, offering a nice EVF (650$)
The nx300 is a gorgeous camera, for me the best mirrorless camera with no EVF; it has the best IQ, ultra-fast hybrid focus, focus peaking, very fast operations, touch screen for touch to shoot and touch to focus and many more. All for a price of about 750$.

Till when such big sites won't consider this line, also the users won't know about its existence and how good it is.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
12 upvotes
Jorginho
By Jorginho (10 months ago)

Yeah we will always have these kind of arguments "why is my camera/brand not mentioned!" I think both Fuji and Samsung ILCs could have been added, but for some reason they were not. Not that it will matter much.

3 upvotes
tecnoworld
By tecnoworld (10 months ago)

Fuji has only the x-m1 below 1000$ and it's just been announced, so no one knows if it's good. Samsung has a wide lineup out for ages, all well below 1000, all great cameras, but they simply ignore them.

6 upvotes
Pythagoras
By Pythagoras (10 months ago)

what??? the fuji x-e1 is $800. ridiculous that it's not on this list.

3 upvotes
MarkInSF
By MarkInSF (10 months ago)

I guess if he can sneak in a body-only OM-D E-M5, the XE-1 could have been included, but I think neither should have been. Let's have them as typically sold, with lens.

0 upvotes
Matt1645f4
By Matt1645f4 (10 months ago)

Just Bought my Second K5 for less than the £500 listed here!!! for the money you would have to be mad not to snap a K5 whilst stocks last.......

3 upvotes
vroger1
By vroger1 (10 months ago)

I have a GF1 ( amongst other Panasonic m4/3 ILCs) and then went to the GX1- The camera is so tremendous- (when coupled with the accessory finder) that the other day when my camera shop had the body on sale for $229.00, I bought a second body. I my opinion, no matter what bells and whistles (ie: built in finder- wi fi- gps- or cfoffee maker) that Panasonic adds to its next model (GX2 ??)- the GX1 has it all. I cannot see myself going from there so long as I continue to use m-4/3. I cannot laud this camera enough- at $250.00 (USD) body only, the camera is an absolute steal. Don't forget- the digicam uses all lenses for which there is an adapter including Leica glass. That's what got me into ILC's to begin with. Panasonic is the greatest!

Comment edited 31 seconds after posting
3 upvotes
Pythagoras
By Pythagoras (10 months ago)

i have a gf1 and gx1 also. they are gently used, still in perfect working condition. if anyone is interested in buying them let me know (in the US).

1 upvote
LJ - Eljot
By LJ - Eljot (10 months ago)

"...typically provide plenty of manual controls, comfortable ergonomics,..."

And then there are the Nikon D5200 and the EOS Rebel. Cameras that have only one dial.

2 upvotes
jadmaister2
By jadmaister2 (10 months ago)

well most Nikon's have 'only one dial', but look closely and you'll see lots of wheels and buttons to push. Wheels and buttons are manual controls, and both Nikon and Canon do huge amounts amounts of R&D into ergonomics, so???

5 upvotes
Tord S Eriksson
By Tord S Eriksson (10 months ago)

I think I'd buy a Nikon V2 for that kind of money, and be pleased as punch!

1 upvote
electrophoto
By electrophoto (10 months ago)

yeah, including the not too amazing lenses and 1" sensor... neat.
(I know there's an adapter for the other nikon lenses... but that kind of defies the purpose of the small V2, doesn't it).

2 upvotes
marike6
By marike6 (10 months ago)

I just purchased a brand-new Nikon V1 / 10 2.8 kit and 18.5 f/1.8 for exactly half of that money and I've been doing cartwheels around the house ever since. But there are tons of great cameras for under a grand.

@electrophoto

DxOMark just tested all N1 lenses, and the 18.5 1.8 and 6.7-13 VR tested great. The 1" sensor is competitive with the 12 mp Panasonic sensor m43 cameras, but the AF and fast processing are trump card from the N1 cameras.

Comment edited 12 minutes after posting
2 upvotes
electrophoto
By electrophoto (10 months ago)

@marike6

Quite certainly that (35mm equiv.) 50mm (the 18.5mm) f/4.9 lens or the 86mm (the 32mm) f/3.2 is something to enjoy, as long as you refrain from trying anything where you'd like to use DOF to separate subjects from background.
Even worse with that 27 (10mm) at an approx. equiv. of f/7.6...
(although arguably that one at 27 is more for landscapes, where you most often want a lot of DOF)

So those lenses (exception the 32mm) give you less flexibility than most cheap DSLR kit lenses...

I am NOT implementing that the V2/V1 cameras are bad in any regard, they have their purpose... but they compete not well against even basic APS-C dSLR / mirrorless, even m4/3.
The major appeal it has is the integrated EVF, tiny size & price, but beyond this it offers very little enchanting stuff in respect to photographic merits.

Comment edited 3 minutes after posting
1 upvote
Tord S Eriksson
By Tord S Eriksson (10 months ago)

I am not a Fuji user, but why wasn't the X-E1 on the list?

I come from Pentax, and paid almost thrice the current price for my K-5, not that long ago ... The K-30, which has a much more modern sensor, and processor, keeps most of the features of the K-5, at a lower price.

The only down side with the K-30, compared to the K-5, is the former's noisier shutter, and somewhat uglier looks!

The upside with the K-30 (which just has been replaced by the K-50) is much better focusing, better low light picture IQ, and over all speedier operation.

Both are sealed against water, both are reliable cameras, with a nice, user-friendly, menu system.

11 upvotes
peevee1
By peevee1 (9 months ago)

"I am not a Fuji user, but why wasn't the X-E1 on the list?"

Maybe because compared to OM-D E-M5 it does not have all-weather metal body, great stabilization for all lenses, tilting screen, fast autofocus and great system of small lenses? And street prices are actually close, you can find E-M5 body for something like $850, with 14-42 (similar in range to Fuji 18-55) for $900, and with 12-50 (better range, weather sealed, powerzoom, macro) for $1150.
Easy choice.

0 upvotes
Ben O Connor
By Ben O Connor (10 months ago)

Mike Pearlman reviews rocks. Seriously, he used to be in my youtube reviewerd top 3 list. Without him the list is
Digitalrev
camerastore canada
Blunty3000

Mike review some of your own, at a new youtube account.

0 upvotes
earthling19
By earthling19 (10 months ago)

I think it speaks volumes that half of these cameras come equipped with a Sony-produced sensor

11 upvotes
sensibill
By sensibill (10 months ago)

And yet DPR ignores Sony cameras like the A57, A65, A37, etc.

1 upvote
Impulses
By Impulses (10 months ago)

You posted the same complaint twice, yet the SLT-A65 is rightthere one list (3rd)...Probably one of the better Alpha values atm too (unlike the models picked in other lines).

2 upvotes
cgarrard
By cgarrard (10 months ago)

Volumes of what?

1 upvote
capacidy
By capacidy (10 months ago)

How about Pentax K-01??

0 upvotes
wildkat2
By wildkat2 (10 months ago)

While I agree that it is an interesting camera (I own one) it is discontinued and availability is pretty limited. Additionally, its RAW shooting rate makes it extremely limited and the requirement to use the screen to compose shots means anything bigger than the FA 77 is problematic. Again, I like my K-01 but I would not call it a "best of."

0 upvotes
tecnoworld
By tecnoworld (10 months ago)

The k-01 is very good, but it's bulky, a bit slow in af and the big flange distance makes it not suitable for legacy lenses.

Samsung nx300, imo, is now a much better mirrorless camera than k-01, with more pancakes, smaller size, articulated touch screen, ultra fast hybrid af and so on.

Just one feature is missing: ibis.

1 upvote
wildkat2
By wildkat2 (10 months ago)

@tecnoworld - Cant agree that the K-01 is bulky. It is about as small as I would want a camera that I am putting real lenses on. Any smaller and you are holding the lens, not the camera.

The flange distance is identical to that which those "legacy" lenses were made for so I dont understand how that can be an issue.

As for pancake lenses, no one has as many as Pentax including the DA 40mm XS which is the "kit" lens for the K-01 and the thickness of a body cap. When you add in the "tiny but not pancake" FA 43, FA 50, FA 77, DA 50, DA 30, DA 15 Limited Pentax has more small lenses than anyone.

0 upvotes
tecnoworld
By tecnoworld (10 months ago)

Wildkat: 6cm thick for a ,irrorless is, for me, bulky. Samsung nx300 is 4cm for the grip and the lens mount, 3cm for the rest and it has tiltable screen...

Nx has some real pancakes, ie: 10,16,20 and 30mm.

Comment edited 20 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
Model Mike
By Model Mike (9 months ago)

I have one, and it's very good at what it does best (tripod photography, reviving manual lenses), but too limited in other areas partly due to lack of an OVF, and partly because of some omissions like a remote release socket. Despite its flaws, I love the styling, and have a lot of fun using it.

0 upvotes
Anepo
By Anepo (10 months ago)

I had the GX1..... focus is crap & it is a very loud camera compared to other micro four thirds from olympus.

1 upvote
JONNO G
By JONNO G (10 months ago)

I agree with all, especially the omd em5, but what about the Olympus EPL 5, same sensor as em5. Also what about the pentax k30 or k50?

2 upvotes
sohrab bonyanalam
By sohrab bonyanalam (10 months ago)

What about Panasonic lumix G6!!!

0 upvotes
DanCee
By DanCee (10 months ago)

What about it? It is listed there

3 upvotes
Impulses
By Impulses (10 months ago)

I'm surprised the G6 made the list given all the complaints about Panasonic using older sensors (maybe I've spent too much time lurking on the boards lately?) and the fact that the G5's price will probably drop like a rock soon (same sensor)... Though I guess the G6 does add several valuable or innovative features like Wifi/NFC, the OLED EVF, focus peaking (a first for m43?), etc.

1 upvote
ThePhilips
By ThePhilips (10 months ago)

"I'm surprised the G6 made the list given all the complaints about Panasonic using older sensors"

The "older sensor" claim is getting tired. It is probably not to standards of current slew of Sony ones, but still a sensor with pretty usable ISO 3200. OK, it might clip highlights/shadows, but really, in real life the difference is much less pronounced than it is in pixel peeping.

Sony sensors are always "revolutionary" and whatnow, but Panny's lagging *constantly* 1/3-2/3 EV behind are not really "old". (They simply can't catch up, sadly.)

Even GF6, with supposedly ancient sensor, has very good IQ. Check out the studio tests at Imaging Resource's "Comparometer":
http://www.imaging-resource.com/IMCOMP/COMPS01.HTM
DPR ignores most of the low-end Panny stuff, but others do test and review them.

1 upvote
Impulses
By Impulses (10 months ago)

Oh don't get me wrong, I didn't intend to add to the cacophony... I'm actually interested in both the GF6 & the G6 right now (one as a gift, the other for myself).

Cameralabs.com puts out some pretty nice/comprehensive reviews on Panasonic models as well, tho they seem to have skipped the 5 series like several other sites... I guess you could view the GF6, the GX1 sensor, as a bad value; but I quite like the overall feature set.

0 upvotes
Jorginho
By Jorginho (10 months ago)

It is a great, very well rounded camera. Nothing seems to be missing here. Even AF tracking, from what I saw, was reasonable. A very fine candidate!

0 upvotes
Valterj
By Valterj (10 months ago)

In this list many good cameras are not included: Sony NEX-5R, Samsung cameras, ...

In the title : "Best DSLRs and ILCs for less than $1000"

Why did you include Olympus OM-D E-M5: $1299 with 12-50mm kit lens

And Fuji cameras like Fujifilm X-E1 16.3MP $799.00 are not included in this list...

14 upvotes
Impulses
By Impulses (10 months ago)

Yeah the OMD was an odd choice given the title... It's certainly popular and I guess one outlier over $1k isn't a big deal, but I imagine there's dozens of other valid choices once you raise the budget by 30%...

3 upvotes
Felix11
By Felix11 (10 months ago)

It would have been much better to have stuck to $1000 including a lens and not put the OM-D.

However, once the rule was broken then not including the Gold award winning Fujifilm X-E1 (body $799, with kit zoom $1,199) in the gap between the $1000 and $1299 models was just bad service to anybody who actually uses the article for it's stated purpose.

11 upvotes
steveh0607
By steveh0607 (10 months ago)

The OM-D is under $1,000 now.

3 upvotes
Marty4650
By Marty4650 (10 months ago)

...and the OM-D is just a shade over $1,000 with the 14-42mm lens.

I suppose this should be considered because it is the only camera on the list that comes with an upgrade lens. If you want a non weather sealed kit lens with a plastic lens mount like all the other cameras have... then the price is around $1,000.

4 upvotes
Jorginho
By Jorginho (10 months ago)

I have to agree. I use the EPl5 and the Gh2, the OMd is probably still the best m43 cam out there etc. But it simply costs 1299 dollar according to them with a lens and it should not have been included in the list.

1 upvote
RadPhoto
By RadPhoto (10 months ago)

@Felix11 good point. It seems to me this is some marketing stuff from our friends at preview(a.k.a Amazon has a stock that needs to be gone).

Comment edited 29 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
Skrocki
By Skrocki (10 months ago)

For $479 the Canon EOS-M with 22mm F/2 STM pancake lens is a much better camera than the Panasonic GX1.

0 upvotes
Hugo808
By Hugo808 (10 months ago)

In everything but speed.....which counts for a lot.

8 upvotes
thinkfat
By thinkfat (10 months ago)

If you are James May, maybe...

6 upvotes
007peter
By 007peter (10 months ago)

I like both EOS-M and GX1 - plan to buy both. But EOS-M is NOT the better camera: canon is missing (1) Ultra-Fast AF, GX1 is about 3~5x faster than EOS-M in focusing, no joke, even with the firmware 2.02 update; (2) GX1 has a Build-in Bounce-able Flash that canon lacks. When you add Canon speed lite EX-90 to EOS-M, the SIZE has gotten to BIG that you're better off buying a Canon Rebel SL1.

Where canon wins is in price, I can buy a cheap 22mm F/2 STM lens new of ebay for around $110. Where as Panasonic 20/1.7 cost me nearly $350. Ouch....

I like Canon EOS-M because of overall price with 22mm STM. But if you compare camera-to-camera, function for functions, Panasonic GX1 wins.

4 upvotes
Jorginho
By Jorginho (10 months ago)

I wonder what part of that cam is better? there does not seem to be much that is better. Why was Samsung not added? Why was EPL5 (how about a cam being better than the EOS-M btw) not added. Etc.

1 upvote
peevee1
By peevee1 (9 months ago)

Skrocki, how is it a better camera? It has about the same IQ, worse controls, much slower autofocus, no viewfinder support, no built-in flash and like 10 times smaller native lens system.

0 upvotes
CameraLabTester
By CameraLabTester (10 months ago)

These cameras all look like graduating students with their tassels hanging out from their mortar boards...

.

2 upvotes
Gesture
By Gesture (10 months ago)

Canon EOS Rebel T4i Digital SLR Camera with EF-S 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 IS Lens

Good choice. Just saw it on eBay for $600.

1 upvote
dougjgreen1
By dougjgreen1 (10 months ago)

My main issue with this list is that right now, the Panasonic Lumix G5 is a better deal than the G6, because its available for roughly half the price, and it's around 90% the same camera.

But I get the fact that it's politically incorrect on a gear site like this to recommend a camera that's on end of life clearance over the model that is replacing it.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
5 upvotes
Barney Britton
By Barney Britton (10 months ago)

It's a short list of 10 - among which, actually, are some 'end of life' models.

3 upvotes
Hugo808
By Hugo808 (10 months ago)

"But I get the fact that it's politically incorrect on a gear site like this to recommend a camera that's on end of life clearance over the model that is replacing it."

Like how they recommend the 650D and D7000?

0 upvotes
Earthlight
By Earthlight (10 months ago)

And Canon 70D is just around the corner.

0 upvotes
steveh0607
By steveh0607 (10 months ago)

Just because the D7000 has been replaced doesn't make it a worthless camera. It's an excellent camera.

1 upvote
Jorginho
By Jorginho (10 months ago)

I disagree. the budget is under a 1000 $. The G6 fits nicely, has FP, has better JPEGs at least. has much better video and controls for it. has a much better EVF. I would never chose the G5 over the G6 even if it was half the price. But okey: that is just me.

0 upvotes
dougjgreen1
By dougjgreen1 (10 months ago)

Well, perhaps the video on the G6 is noticeably better, but I don't shoot video at all, and as a still camera, the G5 is extremely close to the G6 in capability. To me, the difference between the G5 and G6 would be worth something on the order of $150-200 tops. But that's just me, and I'm quite happy with the G5 body I picked up a month ago for less than $290.

0 upvotes
RadPhoto
By RadPhoto (10 months ago)

@Barney Britton
Did Amazon trigger this? :-)

0 upvotes
wish_i_could_shoot
By wish_i_could_shoot (10 months ago)

GX1 is end-of-life clearance for all practical purposes. Its unannounced replacement is supposedly right around the corner, but I don't see the GX1 getting any cheaper.

0 upvotes
ezradja
By ezradja (10 months ago)

Probably it's just me, but I find the selections not very good anymore. Probably because of new breeds of serious compact camera such as x100, rx100, g1x etc even pentax q or nikon 1 are more interesting to me these days...

3 upvotes
RedFox88
By RedFox88 (10 months ago)

Hmm, are you after good photos or "cool new tech gadgets"?

3 upvotes
Guidenet
By Guidenet (10 months ago)

Yep, it's just me. Probably because the better breeds of full frame serious cameras such as the D800 or 1DX or even the D600, A99 or 6D are even interesting to me these days...

1 upvote
nikonuser72
By nikonuser72 (10 months ago)

Nikon1 is more interesting than D7000 ????......and this is a photography forum ????
Obviously you are after "cool new tech gadgets"

0 upvotes
ezradja
By ezradja (10 months ago)

my work (studio and wedding) camera is full frame, Nikon D700 and cropped sensor Nikon D7000, while I also have 550D, G11 and G1X at home for anything else. Yeah, probably I just bored with DSLR type camera, would love to have pentaq Q or even considering RX100 (the new version seems interesting)

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
flipmac
By flipmac (10 months ago)

G1X!?

0 upvotes
Nikonworks
By Nikonworks (10 months ago)

Most retailers hold a straight forward 'Inventory Sale', of which this article clearly seems to be, except the straight forward part.

DPReview please take notice:
When I was a kid 'slot cars' were the newest and 'biggest' thing.
Stores opened up just with slot car race tracks. It was fantastic but very short lived because the market place became overloaded with slot cars and accessories to the point the kids could not keep up with the market.
The whole market folded like a deck of cards.

Of late, you, the editors are doing the same thing here at DPReview.
You have too many Final Reviews to post before listing 'Old cameras under $1000'. You are reaching in all directions, phones, tech, cameras, etc.
You are making this site unwieldly and soon ambiguous.

You better get together and focus on your mission.

At the same time you can discuss formally thanking me for my 'Real World Samples' suggestion.

9 upvotes
RedFox88
By RedFox88 (10 months ago)

Aren't we high on ourselves?!

0 upvotes
Barney Britton
By Barney Britton (10 months ago)

This was written by an external contributor - get down off your high horse.

13 upvotes
Nikonworks
By Nikonworks (10 months ago)

And you the editors posted it.

I have read several of your replies to to
those posting comments and you are rather rude.

3 upvotes
ET2
By ET2 (10 months ago)

Funny you say you are rather rude, when you first comment itself was obnoxiously rude.

8 upvotes
Barney Britton
By Barney Britton (10 months ago)

What he said.

But seriously, we don't mean to be rude. It's just that we see the same names popping back up here again and again, making the same negative comments, and eventually (like at 8:30pm on a friday night when we're still working) you just get... tired.

Yes we posted this article. By an external contributor. And it took all of a couple of hours, in total to edit and illustrate. Take it or leave it. Some people will find it useful. Maybe it's not for you, and that's OK.

Comment edited 3 minutes after posting
17 upvotes
nikonuser72
By nikonuser72 (10 months ago)

This is the most helpful article for "photographers" in recent times.....thank you DPR.....do come up with articles helpful for photographers in future and not for "cool gadget loving idiots"

0 upvotes
Nikonworks
By Nikonworks (10 months ago)

I suggest you re-read my comment.

Here is the important part:

'Of late, you, the editors are doing the same thing here at DPReview.
You have too many Final Reviews to post before listing 'Old cameras under $1000'. You are reaching in all directions, phones, tech, cameras, etc.
You are making this site unwieldly and soon ambiguous.

You better get together and focus on your mission.'

And your reply is for me to get off my high horse.

2 upvotes
petermoons
By petermoons (10 months ago)

my my mr.britton ... no wonder dpr is such a volatile place at times.

Comment edited 24 seconds after posting
2 upvotes
robbo d
By robbo d (10 months ago)

Goodness, we get worked up don't we......
Thought it was a good read, especially on a weekend.....
Nice job. Especially when the old cameras are for some a very relevant market. Not everyone can afford new stuff straight onto the market and choose our upgrades very seriously. So this IS very relevant......gosh even the Pentax supports will have to be fairly happy with the comments here...and that takes a lot...Lol
Also...being an old filmy, I am now very much a smartphone user and value some of the recent articles which is very much now a huge part of photography. Look at what Samsung and Nokia are in the process of bringing to the table??
Understand the times and Dpr's need to keep up with everyone, not just the traditionalists

0 upvotes
thirup
By thirup (10 months ago)

Tanks for the article. Thanks for working late, so we have something to read during the weekend.

0 upvotes
ET2
By ET2 (10 months ago)

Nikonworks, "I suggest you re-read my comment."

this guy still can't see that his post was rude and arrogant.

0 upvotes
Scott Birch
By Scott Birch (10 months ago)

Nikonworks I suggest you set up your own site if you don't like this one. But I'm not holding my breath.

0 upvotes
g7star
By g7star (10 months ago)

Buy Now link needs to be corrected for Panasonic Lumix DMC-GX1. Thank you for the article.

1 upvote
RedFox88
By RedFox88 (10 months ago)

LOL!

0 upvotes
Barney Britton
By Barney Britton (10 months ago)

Fixed, sorry ;)

0 upvotes
Gesture
By Gesture (10 months ago)

Need a Samsung on the list.

10 upvotes
Sergiusbr
By Sergiusbr (10 months ago)

Samsung 20MP NX1000 with 20-50mmm kit about U$D300.00 seems a good deal (ordered one). Samsung lenses are not that expensive and very good too (nice pancakes and that 20-50mm is collapsible and very sharp). Also, the NX 's UI is great. Samsung's marketing need to improve to support some editors, media, etc, then It will get listed any day, and then,maybe, some prejudices will be broken.

7 upvotes
Jorginho
By Jorginho (10 months ago)

About samsung and marketing: they are doing a great job here in NL, but sadly they focus on the Galaxy (small sensor) cams for 90% of the time. But at least they are making a name for themselves. I think they do a much better job currently, over here, than Oly and Panny for instance.

0 upvotes
Bron
By Bron (10 months ago)

I got a Samsung NX1000 w/20-50mm kit and then added the 16mm f2.4 which is a treat. Definitely a superb value at current prices. Samsung lenses are good and very aggressively priced. I love the Panny's and Oly's, too, but the NX1000 at $300 w/kit lens is hard to beat.

2 upvotes
tecnoworld
By tecnoworld (10 months ago)

Bron: yes, for unbiased ppl, it is :-)

2 upvotes
markgv
By markgv (10 months ago)

With the release of the new Pentax K-50, the Pentax K-30 for under $500 is an incredible amount of quality camera for the price.

5 upvotes
Guidenet
By Guidenet (10 months ago)

They choose by order of sales volume. Pentax gets just one. K5 or K30? They chose the first. Nikon and Canon both get two. Samsung is not relevant. Zero. See how it works. If Pentax increases market share, they might get two next year, and it has nothing to do with Amazon. ;-)

1 upvote
Barney Britton
By Barney Britton (10 months ago)

Not true. But a nice theory. The truth is that we can't please everyone, all the time, in short articles like this. That's why we asked for extra suggestions in the comments :)

2 upvotes
vtpachyderm
By vtpachyderm (10 months ago)

Agree - the K-30 is really such incredible value for money at the moment. While the K-5 still comes in under the $1000 limit the K-30 just makes so much more sense when comparing prices.

Either way, thanks for the article.

0 upvotes
Felix11
By Felix11 (10 months ago)

From the DPR review of the Pentax K5 II:
"slow autofocus was a concern with the K-5, and we found AF to be just about right with the K-5 II, and really quite good in low light"

Sounds to me like they should have selected the K5 II ($983) !

0 upvotes
wildkat2
By wildkat2 (10 months ago)

I love my K-5 but with the K-5II now available for less than $1000 it might have been a better choice.
Hard to recommend the K-30 with the K-50 available soon but there is no denying that the K-30 is an incredible value.
Looking forward to a full review of the K-50.

1 upvote
Gesture
By Gesture (10 months ago)

I understand, Barney, but a better article would be Best DLSR or ILC camera for less than $600. For $!K, I don't think there's any doubt you can find a wonderful camera. What can we do for $600-which I still consider quite a lot of money.

0 upvotes
reginalddwight
By reginalddwight (10 months ago)

The "buy now" button with a direct link to Amazon's website does make this buyer's guide from DPR appear like a subtle advertisement for the parent company. Only mildly less subtle than the paid advertisements that appear on the right side of the webpage IMO.

9 upvotes
Barney Britton
By Barney Britton (10 months ago)

Some of the products linked to aren't actually sold by amazon (look closely). Seriously, this is just convenience. One link, to one place, that everyone knows, and most people trust. That's all.

It's either that or place commercial links at the foot of the page (above the comments section, by the way) which in an article like this, covering 10 cameras, would be about a meter of little yellow boxes.

6 upvotes
Guidenet
By Guidenet (10 months ago)

I'm not sure there's anything at all wrong with the parent company advertising or linking to the reviews. I'd think it would be not so smart to link to some other online store. Whether it's a convenience or just good honest capitalism, it makes sense to me. I doubt anyone is dumb enough to be artificially swayed by normal advertising including Buy Now links going to the parent site.

1 upvote
Gesture
By Gesture (10 months ago)

My personal advice. Check out each linked seller on Amazon. There is great variation in the return and other policies. Some follow Amazon policies; others have their own, which can include restocking fees. I always check out the seller ratings, also.

2 upvotes
wildkat2
By wildkat2 (10 months ago)

Um this is no different than 99% of photo websites out there. Got to pay the bills and Amazon has one of the better affiliate programs. Yes, I know Amazon owns DPR but I have no doubt they looked at affiliate revenue and thought "why not just buy the whole thing?"

1 upvote
Gesture
By Gesture (10 months ago)

Fine. Just say a Guide "brought to you by Amazon.com." Let B&H and Adorama have their own guides?

1 upvote
chlamchowder
By chlamchowder (10 months ago)

I think a really good idea is to go to KEH, and go through the used DSLR bodies there, looking for ones that match your needs. Then, do a second check on other sites that sell used gear to see if you can get an even better price.

For example, if you're shooting sports in good light, a Canon 1D II can do a better job than a lot of options on this list, while costing less. If you just want a solid camera with good controls, you get a Nikon D200 for less than $300. Or if you're adventurous, you could get a first generation pro DSLR (D1 or 1D series) for a really low price.

Unless you're looking for megapixels, high ISO performance, or video, you can save a lot of money by going for the oldest DSLR on the used market that still fits your needs. And even if you want MP/ISO performance/video, buying second hand versions of new cameras can still save you some money.

3 upvotes
Gesture
By Gesture (10 months ago)

I agree and KEH, Adorama, Robertscamera give 6-month warranty on used.

1 upvote
Shamael
By Shamael (10 months ago)

I run my Fuji S5 with the biggest pleasure, I never bought any new DSLR after that one. I have a NEX-7 for mirrorless, I do not like the Fuji grear in this level for the reason of raw processing issues with the sensor emulation. Too many artifacts for me, despite that NEX-7 has some moiré issues as well, but the images are stunning, when processed with C1Pro.

2 upvotes
riveredger
By riveredger (10 months ago)

where can one get the 60D with 18-135 for only $750?

0 upvotes
Barney Britton
By Barney Britton (10 months ago)

Fixed, sorry.

0 upvotes
Shotcents
By Shotcents (10 months ago)

Not much of a guide. Looks like a plug for Amazon. There's really no info here at all.

9 upvotes
Barney Britton
By Barney Britton (10 months ago)

Amazon doesn't need the plug - there's lots of info here, both in text and the dpreview pages that we link off to.

18 upvotes
ThePhilips
By ThePhilips (10 months ago)

"Looks like a plug for Amazon."

Well. All other review sites "plug" a store - often multiple stores. Most review sites do generate revenue mostly from the ads and affiliate links. There's nothing wrong with it. That's how internet works. And everybody knows it.

4 upvotes
wayfarers
By wayfarers (10 months ago)

Nothing from Fujifilm series X offering? Why?

2 upvotes
viking79
By viking79 (10 months ago)

You did read the title, right? Under $1000. XE1 and XP1 are both well over with lenses.

3 upvotes
viking79
By viking79 (10 months ago)

I think the guide is a good idea, because the older cameras are often great buys. You often get a lot more for your money buying a closeout model.

Comment edited 30 seconds after posting
3 upvotes
wayfarers
By wayfarers (10 months ago)

@viking79: Amazon, Fujifilm X-M1 kit with 16-50mm Lens, $799.95. Yes, I did read the title. Right.

3 upvotes
daveco2
By daveco2 (10 months ago)

Thanks for this very useful roundup. Although I've owned (and still have) several of these models, I always like to see them in the context of the other players. But I'm really waiting for your review of the Pana LF1 and comparables.

1 upvote
viking79
By viking79 (10 months ago)

@wayfarers, yeah, on a camera that isn't available for a month or two. Sure. These are all well rated cameras they posted links too. They can't even rate the X-M1 for months yet.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
2 upvotes
Yaisog Bonegnasher
By Yaisog Bonegnasher (10 months ago)

@viking79: The Olympus is well over $1000 with lens – so why is that included and not the X-E1? It is listed in its review at $999.95 body-only – just like the E-M5.
I know you can't post all possible cameras here, but maybe at least the ones with a Gold Award?

0 upvotes
sohrab bonyanalam
By sohrab bonyanalam (10 months ago)

What about Panasonic lumix G6!!!

0 upvotes
lattesweden
By lattesweden (10 months ago)

Hi!

I have a Panasonic G1 with the standard kit zoom lens. I wanted a tele zoom for it. They cost about 2500 SEK (the swedish currency). I found a kit with the G5, a standard zoom and a tele zoom for 5000 SEK. If I sell my old G1 and one of the normal zooms I guess I'll get 1000 maybe little more. So the G5 upgrade will be 1500 SEK (225 USD). Cameras cost more here due to higher VAT so this is a very good price.

I guess that you can find simular deals elsewhere for all type of brands when a new model has arrived.

Best regards from Sweden!
/Anders Lattermann

0 upvotes
ByronP
By ByronP (10 months ago)

This must be a filler article, because it basically only shows cameras that were reviewed by someone (the writter) in the past. For instance, the canon sl1 has not been reviewed yet by this web site, but its sensor is the same or better than the other canon cameras mentioned and it is smaller and lighter.

0 upvotes
Leonard Shepherd
By Leonard Shepherd (10 months ago)

The article shows "interesting" discrepancies between USA and UK prices. The Lumix GX1 costs more UK £ than USA $, indicating UK us vastly overpriced. The Canon 60D and Sony A65 difference is not as wide as it should be, indicating UK overpricing. Other differences are about right, or favour those in UK.

0 upvotes
a43anshi
By a43anshi (10 months ago)

dpreview has to put unlike option also

0 upvotes
Total comments: 276
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