Best DSLRs and ILCs for less than $1000

Good-quality DSLRs and interchangeable lens cameras (ILCs) typically provide plenty of manual controls, comfortable ergonomics, and support a legacy of lenses for years to come. The fact that cameras like the Canon EOS 5D Mark II and Nikon D7000 are still so popular with enthusiasts, even after newer models have come along, speaks volumes.

Old or new, getting hold of a quality digital camera still requires you to put down a decent chunk of change. In this article we're going to look at ten of the best DSLRs and ILCs available for under $1,000. We've included current cameras that we really like, and last-generation bargains, too. If you're torn between certain models, we hope this guide will help. The 'more info' links go our product pages on dpreview, where you'll find information including detailed specs, sample galleries, user reviews and more, and 'buy now' will take you to amazon.comPrices are body-only, unless otherwise noted, and are correct at the time of writing.

Is there anything missing from the list? Have your say in the comments.

Panasonic Lumix DMC-GX1 | more info. | buy now

$479.95 with 14-42mm kit lens

The rangefinder-styled Panasonic Lumix DMC-GX1 is the most budget-friendly model on this list, available for a mere $250 for the body only. Even bundled with its 14-42mm kit lens, the GX1 is cheaper than many high end fixed-lens compacts. That's not too shabby for a camera touting a 16MP sensor, generous manual controls and full HD video. 

Key Specifications

  • 16MP Micro Four Thirds MOS sensor
  • ISO 160-12,800
  • 3.0", 460k dot touch screen LCD
  • Full AVCHD 1080/60i video (from 30fps sensor output)
  • 11fps burst depth in RAW
  • Continuous full resolution shooting at 4fps
  • Continuous shooting up to 20fps (at reduced resolution)
  • Orientation sensor (providing information with non-OIS lenses)
  • Electronic level gauge
  • Four available Fn buttons (two onscreen)
  • Built-in stereo microphones

One of the benefits of the GX1 is its compact size. Coupled with its stellar image quality, the camera is a dynamite companion for a pro looking for a lot of power in a small frame to keep in an accessible pocket at all times. The GX1 is also well-built and rugged, and is of course compatible with all Panasonic (and Olympus) Micro Four Thirds lenses. Another ergonomic benefit of the GX1 is the camera's touchscreen interface and rear-mounted command dial.

With a robust set of manual controls, as Panasonic has been known for, great image quality and solid, compact handling, the Panasonic Lumix DMC-GX1 is an amazing bargain right now, while stocks last.

Click here to read our review of the Panasonic Lumix DMC-GX1 (February 2012)

Canon EOS 60D | more info. | buy now

$899 with EF 18-135mm kit lens

The EOS 60D was announced in 2010, as Canon's update to the popular 50D. The 60D shares its 18 megapixel sensor with several Rebel models (including the new Rebel T5i/EOS 700D), housing it in a compact body with flip-out LCD screen. The 60D features a similar movie mode to that of the EOS 7D, and sits just beneath it in Canon's DSLR lineup, targeting the upper echelon of consumer DLSR shooters.

Key Specifications

  • 18MP APS-C CMOS sensor
  • ISO 100-6400 (expandable to 12,800)
  • 5.3 fps continuous shooting
  • Fully articulated 3.0" screen with 1.04 million dots
  • 1080p HD video recording with manual controls
  • SD / SDHC / SDXC storage
  • In-camera raw development

At the time it was released, the 60D won the megapixel war with the D7000, flaunting an 18 megapixel sensor, while Nikon went with 16 megapixels. Image quality from the 60D is great, with a very good low light performance at high ISO levels. The camera's 1080/720p video mode offers a range of frame rates and control over exposure, and overall, video is one of the 60D's major strengths.

Ergonomics are quite impressive as well, courtesy of the articulated LCD screen, comfortable grip, dual command dials, and convenient Q menu for quick adjustments. At its current street price of $600, the 60D is a steal. 

Click here to read our review of the Canon EOS 60D (November 2010)

Sony SLT-A65 | more info. | buy now

$748.00 with 18-55mm kit lens

The Sony SLT-A65 is a model that simply cannot be overlooked in this price range, and the fact that it can be had for around $700 with a kit lens is pretty amazing. The A65's 
mirror is translucent, allowing light to spill through to the imaging sensor with the remainder of it being transferred to the phase-detection AF sensor. Because of this, the camera is able to achieve lightening quick full-time AF operation, including full-time AF in video mode.

Key Specifications

  • 24.3MP APS-C CMOS Sensor
  • 2nd-generation Translucent Mirror Technology
  • 2.4 million dot OLED electronic viewfinder
  • 3-inch TFT Xtra Fine tilting LCD (921,600 pixels) with TruBlack technology
  • ISO range of 100-16,000
  • 15 points (3 cross-type) AF
  • 10fps continuous shooting
  • 1,200-zone exposure metering
  • SteadyShot INSIDE image stabilization
  • AVCHD 60p/60i/24p video recording

Autofocus isn't the only strength of the A65. The camera has a brilliant 2.4-million-dot OLED electronic viewfinder. This is another feature that steers it away from tradition. The A65's LCD screen flips downward and can be rotated, and features a 921,000-pixel resolution. The A65 also excels with a 10fps continuous image capture ability, which blows the competition out of the water when it comes to rapid shooting.

Also worth noting is the A65's  60p HD video feature. 60p means more fluid movement in footage, and is the framerate of choice for televised sports. The A65 also has Sony's in-body SteadyShot image stabilization system to reduce blur and smooth out videos, and includes sweep panorama and built-in HDR modes. Last but not least, the A65 is still one of the megapixel leaders with a 24-megapixel sensor that produces great RAW images.

Click here to read our review of the Sony Alpha SLT-A65 (November 2011)

Pentax K-5 | more info. | buy now

$799.00 with 18-55mm kit lens

The Pentax K-5 a couple of years old but it still brings a lot to the table. It's one of the best APS-C DSLRs in terms of high ISO image quality and low shadow noise at low ISOs. The K-5 has 1080P HD video recording with external microphone support and triple-axis shake reduction. Continuous shooting can reach 7fps, which bests the camera's Canon and Nikon competitors. Pentax is definitely one of the 'cult' brands of the camera world - those who have shot with one are diehards until the end. 

Key Specifications

  • 16.3MP APS-C CMOS sensor
  • ISO sensitivity span of 80-51,200
  • Triple-axis sensor-based shake reduction (horizontal, vertical and rotational correction)
  • SAFOX IX+ 11-point AF system (improved over the K-7)
  • 3in, 921k pixel LCD screen
  • 100% viewfinder coverage (0.92x magnification)
  • Choice of PEF or DNG RAW files
  • Improved handheld HDR function (JPEG mode only)
  • Continuous shooting up to 7fps
  • 1080p HD movie mode
  • Limited in-camera movie editing functionality
  • Socket for external microphone input

The Pentax K-5 is a bit smaller than the 60D and D7000, but it sports one of the most comfortable and ergonomic body designs on the market. It's also exceptionally rigid, courtesy of its rugged magnesium-alloy body, and its weatherproof, as well. One of the features I like most about Pentax cameras in general is their plethora of digital filters and image effects. Even though this can be achieved in Photoshop, it's nice to know that the camera offers the capability, and that the original image can be retained. The K-5 has the most advanced in-camera creative suite in its class.

Other strengths include the camera's speedy autofocus system and unique menu structure. At $800 with a kit lens, the Pentax K-5 is one of the best choices on this list. Its sucessor, the K-5II offers superior autofocus and a handful of other minor improvements, but the K-5 is still a great camera at a very good price.

Click here to read our review of the Pentax K-5 (December 2010)

Nikon D5200 | more info. | buy now 

$796.95 with 18-55mm kit lens

The Nikon D5200 replaces the D5100, a camera that was very popular among amateur photographers and videographers for its impressive image quality and friendly price point. Part of the allure of the D5100 was the fact that it featured the same 16MP sensor with the more advanced D7000. The D5200 continues in this tradition, borrowing the 24MP sensor from the higher-end D7100 (without the no-AA filter trick) at a lower price-point. 

Key Specifications

  • 24.1MP DX-format CMOS sensor
  • EXPEED 3 processing
  • ISO 100-6400 standard, up to 25600 expanded
  • 5 fps continuous shooting
  • 39-point AF system, 9 sensors cross-type
  • 2016 pixel RGB metering sensor
  • 1080p30 video recording, built-in stereo mic
  • 921k dot 3" vari-angle LCD monitor

The D5200 excels in low ISO RAW and JPEG capture, and exhibits minimal noise at high ISOs. In terms of high ISO shooting, the D5200 is up there with the best of its competition. Other highlights include the camera's 39-point AF coverage, in-camera RAW processing a, 3-inch, 921,000 pixel articulated LCD screen, and accurate auto white balance performance across a multitude of environments.

Video mode is also improved with manual audio level control and the ability to output uncompressed HD video to an external recorder. In other respects the D5200 offers similar specifications as the D7000. These include the 9 cross-type AF sensors and 2016 pixel RGB color-sensitive metering sensor.

Click here to read our review of the Nikon D5200 (May 2013)

Canon EOS Rebel T4i | more info. | buy now

$799.95 with 18-55mm kit lens

The T4i is the shortest-lived Rebel in history - it was replaced by the T5i after being on the market for just nine months. The good news is that the T5i brings almost nothing new to the table, aside from three very minor tweaks (new body texture, real-time Creative Filter preview, and a mode dial that can rotate 360 degrees). The T4i is unofficially discontinued but as long as stocks last you can find it for $100 less than the new T5i, and you get basically the same camera.

Key Specifications

  • 18MP APS-C 'Hybrid CMOS' sensor
  • 14-bit DIGIC 5 processor
  • ISO 100-12800 standard, 25600 expanded
  • 9 point AF system, all sensors cross type, central sensor F2.8
  • 63 zone iFCL metering
  • 5 fps continuous shooting
  • Phase detection AF from imaging sensor for Live View and Video
  • Continuous autofocus in movie mode with subject tracking
  • 1080p30 video recording with built-in stereo microphone
  • 1.04m dot, 3" touch-sensitive vari-angle ClearView II LCD

The fact that the T4i can be had for $600 (body only) is pretty great, considering the fact that this is a camera that was only released last fall. The older EOS Rebel T3i (which continues in Canon's lineup) is now only $600 with a kit lens. There are no major differences in terms of quality between the T4i, T3i, and even the T2i - I chose the T4i for this article simply because of its superior video functionality.

With an STM lens, the T4i offers nearly silent autofocus in live view mode, a feature shooters have been asking for for years. That said, the T4i's AF system in Live View is slow at times, but I prefer that over a loud, jerky performance. The T4i offers good image quality and an easy-to-use touch screen interface that enables touch focus and other forms of touch functionality. Compared to the Nikon D5200, the T4i has slightly lower resolution, but this makes little difference in the real world.

Click here to read our review of the Canon EOS Rebel T4i/650D (August 2012)

Panasonic Lumix DMC-G6 | more info. | buy now*

$749.95 with 14-42mm II kit lens

The Lumix G series has always been a favorite of ours, particularly for the robust manual controls, impressive image quality, and advanced video modes. Over time, the G-series has split into four branches - entry-level 'GF' models, rangefinder style GX cameras, high-end GH-series and the mid-range plain old 'G's. The recently-announced G6 replaces last year's G5 and sits above the GF6 and below the GH3 in Panasonic's G-series lineup. 

Key Specifications

  • 16MP Micro Four Thirds MOS sensor
  • ISO 160-12,800 (extendable up to 25,600)
  • 3.0", 1.04 million dot touchscreen LCD
  • 1.44 million dot OLED electronic viewfinder with eye sensor
  • Full AVCHD 1080/60p video with full manual control (and 2.4X digital teleconverter option)
  • 3.5mm external mic socket
  • 7 frames per second continuous shooting, 5 fps with AF-tracking
  • 23 Scene modes including 'Cute Dessert' and 'Sweet Child's Face'
  • iAuto mode can automatically detect when to use 9 scene modes

Panasonic has introduced some standout new features with the G6, one of the most interesting being NFC connectivity. This means files can be transferred by simply tapping a smartphone to the camera, or live 30p HD video can be streamed to a tablet or other capable device. The G6 inherits the GH2's 16-megapixel Live MOS sensor and has the ability to shoot up to 12,800 native ISO, with expandability to 25,600. A 1.44 million dot OLED EVF makes its way onto the G6 as well, and on the back is a fully articulating 3-inch LCD display with a 1.04 million dot resolution and touch-sensitivity.

Focus Peaking, 7fps continuous shooting, and a 1728-zone multi-pattern metering system all add to the G6's bag of tricks. As far as video functions are concerned, 1080/60p recording is nice to see, as well as a stop motion feature. 

Click here to read our peview of the Panasonic Lumix DMC-G6 (April 2013)

Sony NEX-6 | more info. | buy now

$898.00 with 16-50mm Power Zoom kit lens 

It's a struggle to find any major flaws with the 16MP Sony NEX-6. The camera packs in a lot of impressive technology, some of which is inherited from the flagship NEX-7, but it can be found for well under a grand. 

Key Specifications

  • 16.1MP APS-C format CMOS sensor
  • 2.3 million dot resolution OLED EVF
  • ISO 100-25600
  • Control dial
  • Customizable Fn button
  • 'Quick Navi' interactive settings display
  • Built-in Wi-Fi for connection to smartphones or computers, for photo sharing
  • Proprietary in-camera apps
  • Built-in flash (GN 6, ISO 100)
  • Electronic first-curtain shutter
  • 1080/60p HD movies in AVCHD (50p on PAL region models)

One of the major features that sets the NEX-6 apart from its peers is its 2.3 million dot resolution OLED EVF, which not only offers a brilliant picture, but does away with the need for an accessory port and of course the need to spend extra cash on an aftermarket viewfinder. This frees the hotshoe up for other accessories, such as external microphones for video recording, or a more powerful flashgun. The NEX-6 also offers more external manual control with the help of two control dials, and its protruding rubberized grip is nice and comfortable despite the small size of the camera. 

Built-in Wi-Fi is also a feature on the NEX-6, allowing users to connect smartphones and computers to the camera, and the NEX-6 can even be controlled remotely via a smartphone application. Additional features can be added to the NEX-6 via the Sony PlayMemories Store (which is accessible from the camera itself). The camera's Hybrid AF system works very well, and its AF in general is snappy and accurate. Other key selling points include 1080/60p HD video recording with exposure control and continuous AF, an articulating 920K LCD display, and very good image quality. Auto HDR, focus peaking, Sweep Panorama, and Hand-held Twilight / Anti Motion Blur all increase the appeal of the NEX-6 even further, making it a great bargain at its current street price.  

Click here to read our review of the Sony Alpha NEX-6 (March 2013)

Nikon D7000 | more info. | buy now 

$996.95 with with 18-105mm kit lens

The good thing about ever-expanding technology in the photo world is that gems like the Nikon D7000 reach sub-$1,000 price points only a couple of years after they're released. Announced in 2010 the D7000 has proven one of the most popular enthusiast DSLRs of the past few years, and remains highly sought-after even after the arrival of the D7100 in 2012. 

Key Specifications

  • 16.2MP DX-format CMOS sensor
  • ISO 100-6400 (plus H1 and H2 equivalent to ISO 12,800/25,600)
  • 39-point AF system with 3D tracking
  • New 2016 pixel metering sensor
  • 3.0 inch 921k dot LCD screen
  • 1080p HD video recording with mic jack for external microphone
  • Scene Recognition System aids WB/metering and focus accuracy
  • Twin SD card slots
  • New Live View/movie shooting switch
  • Full-time AF in Live View/movie modes
  • Up to 6fps continuous shooting
  • Lockable drive mode dial
  • Built-in intervalometer
  • Electronic level

The Nikon D7000 introduced 1080P HD video recording to Nikon's DSLR lineup, and also featured a 39-area (9 cross-type) TTL AF system with fine tuning (which has since been inherited by the D5200) as well as a 2016-pixel RGB metering sensor and a maximum ISO  sensitivity of 25,600. Six fps continuous shooting, a 100% coverage viewfinder, and dual SD card slots added to the appeal, as well.

The Nikon D7000 excels in build quality, RAW image quality, and high ISO noise performance, and is still one of the best midrange APS-C models you can buy. The D7000's 16MP resolution may seem low compared to the D7100's 24MP, but the difference isn't huge for most purposes, and right now, the D7000 is a bargain.

Click here to read our review of the Nikon D7000 (November 2010)

Olympus OM-D E-M5 | more info. | buy now

$1299 with 12-50mm kit lens

Olympus really knocked it out of the park with the release of the retro-styled OM-D E-M5 last year. Although the E-M5 shares many aesthetic similarities with its film-based predecessors, it's a completely different world on the inside. And a good one. 

Key Specifications

  • 16MP Micro Four Thirds MOS sensor
  • Weather-sealed body
  • Twin control dials
  • New, '5-axis' image stabilization
  • Shoot at up to ISO 25,600
  • Up to 9fps shooting (4.2 fps with continuous AF)
  • 1.44M dot electronic viewfinder
  • 3-inch articulated OLED touchscreen display
  • TruePic VI processor
  • Improved C-AF autofocus with 3D tracking
  • Flash sync speed up to 1/250th sec

Imagine taking every good feature from early Olympus Micro Four Thirds cameras, adding them together and then multiplying them by a substantial amount. That's the OM-D E-M5. It's one of our favorite cameras from the past couple of years. Olympus got it right with the camera's 16 megapixel MOS sensor, which produces stellar image quality. It can shoot up to 9fps continuously, reaches an ISO max of 25,600, and has a fantastic 1.44 million dot EVF with 100% coverage and 120fps refresh rate. The tilting 3-inch touchscreen OLED rear screen is nice to shoot with, and a flash sync speed of 1/250th of a second places the camera right up there with semi-pro DSLRs when it comes to flash photography. 

The OM-D has a lot in its toolkit, but perhaps the most impressive feature is its lightning-quick autofocus. Also, there are horizontal and vertical electronic levels on both the rear screen and viewfinder, five-axis image stabilization is built in, plus a live histogram, highlight/shadow grid adjustment for dynamic range improvement, oodles of white balance adjustments, and of course 11 Art filters that can cross-breed with one another. The OM-D E-M5's design benefits from dual command dials and comfortable weather sealed body, making the camera even more compelling.

Few mirrorless models can contend with the OM-D E-M5, and even though it's just under $1000 for the body only, the camera is worth every penny.

Click here to read our review of the Olympus OM-D EM-5 (April 2012)


Mike Perlman is a freelance photographer and writer, based in Bar Harbor, Maine. After a spell reviewing camcorders at Camcorderinfo.com, Mike moved to infoSync World as the Senior Photography Editor, before taking up a role at TechnoBuffalo.com as the head of the Photography department. These days, Mike runs his own photography business and contributes to dpreview between shoots.

The views and opinions expressed in this article are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions held by dpreview.com or any affiliated companies.

Comments

Total comments: 276
12
Leandros S
By Leandros S (7 months ago)

Pentax K-30 w/ 18-55mm and 50-200mm lens kit for $699.

It's what I've been recommending to people lately.

0 upvotes
Tord S Eriksson
By Tord S Eriksson (7 months ago)

I was a stern believer of Pentax, and the K-5, but eventually sold it, and a head of lenses, to get a D600 (which has slightly lighter oil/dust problems than the K-5), and a handful of nice lenses (loved the DA15, FA43, FA77, & a few more).

Never regretted it for a second, but it is sad that Pentax takes such a cavalier attitude towards the users, and the problems with the SDM (supersonic drive motor), used in many of their lenses.

For years the users had to pay for replacing the faulty SDMs in their lenses, with new ones, that was just as bad as the original ones!

Then, suddenly, the guys at Pentax were very frank, and says 'Oh, yes, we know about that', and still didn't offer any kind of compensation to the customers!

The company eventually did owe up on the K-5 oil splatter problem, as no charge for the customers, and quickly released the K-5 II, that doesn't have that problem in the same degree.

By then they had lost me, and my wife, and I am now in the Nikon camp.

0 upvotes
Leandros S
By Leandros S (7 months ago)

I don't know that the Pentax K-5 II ever had any oil spot problems, and from what I read in forums, switching to Nikon is not the move to make if you're looking for better customer support...

1 upvote
Philnw2
By Philnw2 (5 months ago)

All dslrs have dust problems, but not oil splatter. Some of the K5's has oil underneath the sensor glass cover and for those, Pentax covered with no charge. The K5II never had any oil problems that I've ever heard of. The D600 had continuing oil/dust problems from the shutter mechanism if i recall correctly.

0 upvotes
photoramone
By photoramone (8 months ago)

I am now limited to a canon digital elph and then strictly PENTAX cameras and lenses. Gave my canon eos 30D and lenses to my son. Pentax lenses have always been Better-than-Good". and the price of their glass was reasonable. It always thrills me to read reviews of the K-5 and I agree with the cudows given. I also agree when dpReview states, " Once a pentax enthusiast always a pentax enthusiast". I'm not a Pro..... obviously, but I know what I like....PENTAX.... RJM

3 upvotes
Michel J
By Michel J (9 months ago)

Well, if they would consider the Sony SLT-A37, A57, A58, features VS price for 16 MP, they would be staying on top...

IMHO

2 upvotes
Clint009
By Clint009 (9 months ago)

Consumer Report (August, 2013)

In Advanced Camera the two first places are

1- Lumix DMC FZ200

2- Lumix DMC GH3

3- Nikon D7100

(from 73 tested cameras)

note: the result is in the magazine only unless you are member of Consumer Report to see it on the net.

Check the August, 2013 edition.

2 upvotes
wheatear
By wheatear (9 months ago)

I've just returned a Pentax K-5, bought new from the Camera Centre, Cardiff, via Amazon. The autofocus was unreliable to the point of being useless. Colour renditions, even after resetting to 'Natural' were not pleasing, and under-exposure was the norm. My Panasonic G1 delivered better pictures, in side by side comparison, in almost every one of over 50 shots, indoors and out, mainly landscape and church architecture.

The supplier, the Camera Centre, Cardiff, claim they could find no fault with the camera.

The SD card mechanism is barely fit for purpose, so difficult is it to extract a card without dropping it.

The K-5 was a huge disappointment.

0 upvotes
Leandros S
By Leandros S (7 months ago)

I've had several Pentax DSLR bodies, and I find their card mechanism in particular is excellent. Takes me less than half a second to get the card out.

0 upvotes
Philnw2
By Philnw2 (5 months ago)

Pentax k5 is a marvelous DSLR. Has the quietest shutter of any dslr i know of - doesn't include those PS with small enough sensors they can have electronic shutters. I've also had only a few focus problems in the 3 years i've had the camera. Well built camera. Sure the card receptacle is a little tight when new but i;ve never considered that more than a small problem. I love that camera.!!! I've sold 8 pictures in October from that camera. Take it out in the rain and snow all the time.

0 upvotes
steve norris
By steve norris (9 months ago)

Mmmmmm. I'm sure these are all valid comments and opinions but I don't understand how people get so hung up about specs and cameras. Learn to use even a basic camera properly then, more importantly, learn the skill and art of photography. Then you'll be spending more time selling your work than writing about the pro's and cons of equipment. Only Mho :)

2 upvotes
peevee1
By peevee1 (9 months ago)

Some of us don't have to sell pictures. :)

1 upvote
kavolis
By kavolis (9 months ago)

if you're in microstock, APS-C size sensor camera is a "must have". If you making fineart, then point-and-shoot or hi-end compact camera is OK only if final works is more Photoshop manipulation than photoograph. If you shoot weddings APS-C DSLR is a minimum too.

1 upvote
bcalkins
By bcalkins (9 months ago)

@kavolis - there are no problems getting images accepted at agencies, both RM and microstock, with smaller sensors. For example, Alamy lists the OM-D, MFT cameras and even the Nikon V1/J1, etc on their recommended camera list. http://www.alamy.com/contributor/help/recommended-digital-cameras.asp

0 upvotes
Shashikant
By Shashikant (9 months ago)

Ihave Nikon D7000 and Nikon lenses.I am facing focussing problem with Nikon micro lens 105mm, f/2.8 G IF-ED VR lens in Auto mode. Can you please tell me in general which method will give best results - Auto focus or Manual focus. All the Nikon lenses included.

Comment edited 50 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
steve norris
By steve norris (9 months ago)

If you are close focusing to take advantage of the camera's awesome macro ability you should only use manual mode for accuracy in my experience. If you're using it as a general short tele or portrait lens it should focus well in auto mode. It's not an easy lens to get used to but it will reward your patience with some amazing quality shots.

0 upvotes
Lorrin Baker
By Lorrin Baker (9 months ago)

I noticed this post. Maybe it will help?http://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/42165324

0 upvotes
kavolis
By kavolis (9 months ago)

lot's of peoples facing AF problems with this model. It really has some issues. But most of users even don't understand that this is a camera problem :) because, you know.... it's a NIKON (i.e. highly praised brand).

0 upvotes
ChrisQuijote
By ChrisQuijote (9 months ago)

I would suggest that you never want to shoot macro in auto-focus mode. On any camera - not just a D7000.

I am surprised to hear you say so many people are having issues with the D7000 focusing system. I have used a few of them and they have proven to be great cameras.

1 upvote
Arai
By Arai (7 months ago)

Yep same here for crisp results in macro you need 3 things
1. A sturdy tripod
2. Manual focus
3. At least F18
And then even with a Tokina 100mm I can produce very sharp results with my D7000 by the way VR for Macro is doubtfull so its better not to use it and keep in mind most focus problems in macro are moving subjects ! you can't blame Nikon for that :)

1 upvote
Peter K Burian
By Peter K Burian (9 months ago)

DSLRs AND interchangeable-lens cameras? Well, a DSLR *is* an interchangeable-lens camera. ....

The title should be: DLSRs and **Mirrorless** Interchangeable Lens Cameras.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
3 upvotes
HENNIGArts
By HENNIGArts (9 months ago)

A bit more comparison between the cameras would habe been nice.

0 upvotes
Timmbits
By Timmbits (9 months ago)

Is the sensor in the OMDEM5 really as good as Mike claims? See for yourself, in a head to head comparison with the Fuji xtrans and Samsung NX sensors:

MIRRORLESS UNDER $900:
http://www.dpreview.com/articles/5687252177/mirrorless-cameras-under-900

2 upvotes
Intermittentoverexposure
By Intermittentoverexposure (9 months ago)

Pentax K30 ($490 via Amazon), Tamron 17-50mm F2.8 non-VC ($309 via digitalrev) = $799

Save the $200 and later add the Tamron 70-200 F2.8 non-VC ($769 via Amazon).

Add a Samyang 14mm if you need wide angle (~$350 via everywhere) and you've got everything covered with a constant F2.8.

4 upvotes
Tord S Eriksson
By Tord S Eriksson (7 months ago)

As a former K-5 owner (bought new at top price!) the K-30 is a much better buy, and the lenses you recommend are great as well (have owned both Tamrons)!

1 upvote
Mapel
By Mapel (9 months ago)

where is the conclusion page?

5 upvotes
techmine
By techmine (9 months ago)

Make your own conclusion....LOL..
You could have compiled this list yourself by doing some research on Amazon.... :-)

1 upvote
Dave C 150
By Dave C 150 (9 months ago)

Peevee said:-
"Pentax K-5"
not a bad camera. Of course, no hand-held shooting with long teles for you, and AF tracking is not up to Canon/Nikon standard.
Eh? The opposite is true. In body SR for all lenses going back to the sixties. Which other camera can say that. I have easily shot at 1/200th second hand held with the Sigma 150-500mm. With its brilliant high ISO performance high shutter speeds are easy to get. It is true AF tracking is poor compared to Canon/Nikon though.
Also someone said K-30 has better sensor than K-5. I think you will find they are the same Sony one.

0 upvotes
peevee1
By peevee1 (9 months ago)

Sure, in-body IS is great, except without EVF the viewfinder is unstabilized, so with long teles the view goes all over the place. Try to frame and focus like that. Maybe you can, I cannot do it reliably.

Comment edited 11 minutes after posting
1 upvote
Rftb
By Rftb (9 months ago)

Peevee1 Since you have pretty much bashed every thing on here one way or another, what do you have for a top ten under 1000.00 list.
You seem bothered by this list, so quit bashing, and list your "better cameras" that should have been on the list.

Comment edited 38 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
Albert Ang
By Albert Ang (9 months ago)

Rftb: Peevee1 just pointed the weaknesses for every single camera in the list. It's not an unreasonable bashing imo - it adds a more balance view from the article above. It's just a proof that no camera is perfect for everyone.

1 upvote
peevee1
By peevee1 (9 months ago)

"Peevee1 Since you have pretty much bashed every thing on here one way or another, what do you have for a top ten under 1000.00 list."

I did not bash ALL of them, read carefully, about half of them I write "Good camera" or "Very good camera" first, but I also provide the disadvantages of the particular models (even good cameras have them) which might or might not matter to a particular buyer, but unfortunately that puff piece omits them.

0 upvotes
Tord S Eriksson
By Tord S Eriksson (7 months ago)

I loved the SR/VR/OIS of the K-5, but the AF is really bad. I switched to Nikon just a couple of years back, and haven't regretted it for a second. And the picture quality at high ISO is not the best around (my old K-x was better, than my K-5).

It did shine with the short, wide, lenses, like the DA15, FA 43, FA77 - not found their equals in the world of Nikons. My wife sold her K-5,a nd eventually bought a K-30, a much better camera, AF-wise!

0 upvotes
jshames
By jshames (9 months ago)

Peevee: The Rebel series is geared for beginners and enthusiasts; with kit lens (particularly the T3i) it can be had for a very low price. You enter the world of excellent Canon compatible accessories and lenses, and the T3/4/5 can keep you happy for a long time. Granted the Rebel is not a professional level camera (although I have seen pros with a T3i as a second camera). You can play the 'specs' game forever and play one model off against the other, but that misses the point. The main question is, is the overall package of price, quality, and features attractive or not? The question is not , "is there a better camera?", because there always will be another model with something better.
Having said that, I would concede that it is time for Canon to "refresh" their line of entry and enthusiast level SLRs with something beyond what they have now.

4 upvotes
peevee1
By peevee1 (9 months ago)

It is THE WORST camera in it's class. There are other cameras in its class "geared for beginners and enthusiasts" (no, I don't think Rebel is any good for enthusiasts, what kind of "enthusiast" would be satisfied with it?), and ALL other cameras in its class are better that a Rebel (that is why a Rebel is THE WORST after all). D5200 is better, A-65 is significantly better, and K-30 is much better.

The only other camera which is worse than Rebel T4i is another Rebel, SL1, which adds THE WORST battery life and subtracts even the articulated screen (which is anyway pretty much useless on a DSLRs with their glacially slow LiveView autofocus).

Now read the title - "BEST DSLRs...". What is THE WORST DSLR is doing in the list of "BEST"? That is a problem with the article. Only brand slaves would not see this.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
7 upvotes
Shaun Iza
By Shaun Iza (9 months ago)

Bottom line...you can buy 2 or 3 GOOD Canon lenses for the price of an average N*, S*, P*, Pan*, and O* lens.

0 upvotes
DSHAPK
By DSHAPK (9 months ago)

You are absolutely correct jshames. You can play the specs game and buy only on specs and be a SPECtator instead of a photographer. There is a reason the T4i has been in the top 100 at Amazon for a while. Cameras are one of those things where a more spec'd out camera will not automatically make you a better photographer.

0 upvotes
Kiril Karaatanasov
By Kiril Karaatanasov (9 months ago)

Are not a57 or a58 cameras more suitable for this review? I wonder also a bit on the NEX-6 selection and the OM-D both are nice but pricey. OM-D barely fits the range, while Olympus offers some rather nice new product s for lower price tag right?

0 upvotes
Kiril Karaatanasov
By Kiril Karaatanasov (9 months ago)

OM-D does not actually fit the bill at all "$1299 with 12-50mm kit lens"

1 upvote
peevee1
By peevee1 (9 months ago)

Really and truly, choosing a Rebel shows how disingenuous this list is. Rebel is a literally WORST camera in its category - it has the worst sensor=image quality (the worst dynamic range, the worst noise, the worst color depth), it has the worst tiny pentamirror viewfinder not even covering the whole scene, it has slow processor/sequential shooting speed, it has weak 9-point AF system, it has the worst 1-dial control, it has the worst plastic non-weather-sealed body... What kind of service do you do to your readers putting the worst camera in its category to the top 10 list? Sheesh! I understand that is the best seller because of the brand name Canon had earned - up to 4 years ago - but since then they only sell their name piece by piece, and your site should inform public about things like that.

14 upvotes
flipmac
By flipmac (9 months ago)

A bit harsh but I agree. Anyone I know who started with a Rebel and didn't stay with the basic kit setup, have either gone with a FF Canon or moved to other brands completely.

But the reality is, a potential iLC user buys Canon and sticks to the kit only. If other companies do as well as Canon in marketing and stores like BestBuy don't just try to sell you a Canon by default, other brands would do much better as so many cameras these days are better than the Rebels in many ways.

5 upvotes
peevee1
By peevee1 (9 months ago)

"But the reality is, a potential iLC user buys Canon and sticks to the kit only."

Those who stick with 18-55 only would be better off with RX100. Just as good low light (even a little better at WA), better DR, better zoom range, better controls (the ring around the lens is a second "control wheel" a Rebel lacks), faster frame rate, 60p video, aluminum body, and no dust on the sensor. :) Oh, year, fits into a pocket easily. :)

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 58 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
DSHAPK
By DSHAPK (9 months ago)

Im on my second rebel with the t4i and I love the camera. It scores near the top of the list in entry level cameras for functionality and usability, which trumps the web experts and measurebators opinions.

0 upvotes
Peter K Burian
By Peter K Burian (9 months ago)

AND the EOS Rebel series has been a best seller for many years.

0 upvotes
peevee1
By peevee1 (9 months ago)

"Im on my second rebel with the t4i and I love the camera. It scores near the top of the list in entry level cameras for functionality and usability"

Wrong, it scores at the dead bottom today (and for the last few years). It might have not been so 4 years ago, but market has changed.

2 upvotes
DSHAPK
By DSHAPK (9 months ago)

Iin two words,wrong again. Pure specs do not a better camera make. btw to jshames above...Canon did...its called the 70d.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 4 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
historianx
By historianx (9 months ago)

like gawking at human carnage at crashes on America's highways, I am compelled to read the comments...

17 upvotes
FranciscoJG
By FranciscoJG (10 months ago)

Four-third, APS-C, FX ,Médium Format, and others ?

The market is done by our needs, despite the efforts of marketing to make us need that don't even need.

There are photographic needs that require a lot of compactness, so compact, that compact cameras begin to be threatened by the best mobile phones.

There are photographic needs that require larger sensors (FX) which makes photografic machines larger and heavier, but this is well accepted. To say that, with this format no longer need the APS-C ?

False, there are to many situations benefits of APS-C on FX, I remind me of sports, social photography, reportage... Yes, APS-C as more versatility (advantages) then FX.

Smaller sensors tend to disappear, Yes and thank goodness.

But the FX is not the future, it's just part of it

Comment edited 4 times, last edit 12 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
peevee1
By peevee1 (10 months ago)

"Panasonic Lumix DMC-GX1 $250 body"
even $200 body from adorama/ebay, but $479 with 14-42 is too much, you can get Olympus E-P5 with 14-42 for about that money, and it is vastly superior camera where it matters (much better sensor, faster processor/shooting speed, IBIS, tilting screen...).

"Canon EOS 60D"
wait a few days until 70D is announced, then either buy that if the difference maters for you, or buy 60D cheaper.

"Sony SLT-A65"
avoid, why lose half a stop to nikon D5200, and buy a camera with discontinued hot shoe? Or, if you are too invested into A-mount lenses, at least wait until mirrorless A-mount cameras appear in a few months.

"Pentax K-5"
not a bad camera. Of course, no hand-held shooting with long teles for you, and AF tracking is not up to Canon/Nikon standard.

"Nikon D5200"
poor single dial interface (made for auto shooters?), poor viewfinder, articulated screen is not as useful as it might seem (AF with the screen as good as not working, so slow), better postprocess

3 upvotes
peevee1
By peevee1 (10 months ago)

"Canon EOS Rebel T4i"
as bad as D5200 (see above), only better colors for portraits, but no amount of postprocessing will help you with poor dynamic range for landscapes (and relatively poor low light by modern standards too).
Pentax K30 is simply better than both D5200 and t4i.

"Panasonic Lumix DMC-G6"
the image quality is about as bad as Canon's, A65 and the one in GX1, a lot of marginally useful features like WiFi, good value, the best for video in the group, and I would not put much faith into its tracking, especially in low light.

"Sony NEX-6"
very good camera, amazingly compact with 16-50 lens (if not pixel-peeping-sharp), but tele lenses are bad and huge, and don't get suckered into buying $1100 average primes. But only for the 16-50, very good.

3 upvotes
peevee1
By peevee1 (10 months ago)

"Nikon D7000"
very good camera for stills, if a little too heavy for the quality with just a kit lens - the same sensor/quality can be had in NEX-6+16-50 for the 1/3 of the weight and even less in size, so you better know the reason you choose this one over NEX-6 - namely for still-shooting fast-moving subjects with tele lenses.

"Olympus OM-D E-M5, $1000 body, $1299 with 12-50mm kit lens"

of course it can be had new for about $850 body, $1150 with 12-50. Very good camera, the lens is pretty versatile (macro, PZ, weather sealed), but it is TOO DARK 25mm and later. The only real disadvantage is slow and unreliable tracking of fast-moving subjects (for that you should look at D7000, or wait for the new OM-D rumored to arrive in August-September).

1 upvote
HendeHoq
By HendeHoq (9 months ago)

Nikon D5200 a great camera for stills with a class-leading sensor. Canon 60D (650D too) is worthless, and have а worst sensor in class.

2 upvotes
peevee1
By peevee1 (9 months ago)

"Nikon D5200 a great camera for stills with a class-leading sensor. "

But everything else BUT the sensor is pretty bad, just like on Rebel (which has even the worst the sensor too - no wonder for the worst in class).

0 upvotes
DSHAPK
By DSHAPK (9 months ago)

It's funny...there must be a reason why Canon is able to see it's worthless equipment with it's outdated sensor. There is so much more to a camera and a system than being able to push shadows 5 stops in post processing.

1 upvote
peevee1
By peevee1 (9 months ago)

Just now I have noticed that I wrote "E-P5" in GX1 comments, sorry, of course I meant "E-PL5". E-P5 is way overpriced at $1000 body only, while E-PL5 is a good value at $500 in a kit with 14-42 II. Add $99 40-150 for tele, $69 or so WCON-P01 for UWA down to 11mm, $37 or so MCON-P01 for macro and maybe FCON-P01 for fisheye if you are into such a thing, and you get an extremely light good STABILIZED kit covering all the bases for very very cheap and fitting into a smallest bag.
Are there better quality kits? Sure, but also much more expensive and heavy, more like $2000+ in a wheeled case rather than $700 ($800 with the FCON) in a tiny bag.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 5 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
peevee1
By peevee1 (9 months ago)

"It's funny...there must be a reason why Canon is able to see it's worthless equipment with it's outdated sensor. "

Of course. Brand and advertisement work great on ignorant people.

4 upvotes
HendeHoq
By HendeHoq (9 months ago)

It's simply. Canon was first - first cheap digital cameras, first cheap DSLR, first cheap FF DSLR, first cheap lenses, first cheap photos for many people. Something remains cheap forever.

0 upvotes
DSHAPK
By DSHAPK (9 months ago)

Nice post, also upvotingyour own posts isnt cool. As an ignorant consumer I will throw my money at canon, so they know they dont have to innovate because people like me will always buy their equipment no matter how bad their sensors are. My goal is to show them they don't have to innovate because of people like me. I am secretly trying to help Nikon regain their former glory, now captured by canon.

You guys have a serious case of rebel envy.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 2 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
hiten
By hiten (9 months ago)

Are you sure Olympus E-P5 is that cheap?

I thought Olympus E-P5 price is higher than $1000

0 upvotes
Albert Nurick
By Albert Nurick (10 months ago)

Great idea for a buyer's guide, but what's needed is easy access to a comparison chart.

2 upvotes
Serban Alexandru
By Serban Alexandru (10 months ago)

@Mike Perlman on Canon 650D
Now please explain this:
"There are no major differences in terms of quality between the T4i, T3i, and even the T2i - I chose the T4i for this article simply because of its superior video functionality".
How can you name the superior video of the T4 (650D) over the T3 (600D), when also in DPReview, the conclusions for the 600D, which hold a "Compare" feature, put the 600D by almost half a graph above the 650D, in terms of movie/video? I have based my buying decision for the 600D over the 650D based on DPReview's conclusions, as the remaining photo qualities were already in its favor. I am not disputing your opinion, I am asking: WHICH ARTICLE am I to believe?

Comment edited 3 times, last edit 9 minutes after posting
1 upvote
JWest
By JWest (9 months ago)

The 650D offers continuous AF tracking during video shooting, while the 600D does not. I assume that's what is meant by "superior video" in this context.

0 upvotes
Serban Alexandru
By Serban Alexandru (9 months ago)

Yes, however the continuous AF is a hybrid type, that is phase detection + contrast. According to the review, the phase detection did not yet reach maturity - at least on the 650D. They concluded that it works worse than the conventional, contrast AF of the 600D.

0 upvotes
JWest
By JWest (9 months ago)

That doesn't change the fact that you can auto-focus during video on a 650D, which you can't on a 600D. I'm not arguing that this AF is particularly effective (it appears that it isn't great by any means) but some people might still consider it better than not having that capability at all.

0 upvotes
Serban Alexandru
By Serban Alexandru (9 months ago)

I have to disagree. According to DPReview, not only can one auto-focus in video with the 600D, but also choose the Auto-focus Mode. Quote:
"Just as in regular live view, it's possible to select which form of auto-focus you wish to use at the beginning of recording - Live Mode (contrast detect AF - slow but no need to flip the mirror down), Face Detection Live Mode or Quick Mode. During recording 'Live Mode' AF can be engaged by half-pressing the shutter button, regardless of which initial setting you've chosen, when 'AF w/shutter button during filming' is set to 'Enable'. Alternatively you can of course focus manually".
I would say it would have been somewhat strange not to have auto-focus in video on this type of camera, today.
Nonetheless, the basic issue stays. Sometimes, various articles on DPReview say different things about the same subject, which may be disconcerting.

0 upvotes
Serban Alexandru
By Serban Alexandru (10 months ago)

@Mike Perlman, on Canon 650D
Now please explain this:
"There are no major differences in terms of quality between the T4i, T3i, and even the T2i - I chose the T4i for this article simply because of its superior video functionality".
How can you name the superior video quality of the T4 over the T3, when the Canon 600D review conclusions, which hold a "Compare" feature, put the T3 by approx. half a graph above the T4, in video? I have based my buying decision of the T3 (600D) over the T4, based on DPReview's conclusions, as the other photo qualities were also in its favor. I'm not disputing your opinion, I am asking: WHICH ARTICLE am I to believe?

0 upvotes
mad marty
By mad marty (10 months ago)

i guess Samsung is ignored here because of their low reputation? In Europe the NX1000 incl. kit lens is sold for under 350$ and it's a really good cam.
The sensor is much better than every mft/ft sensor, except the newest Pens for 600$ and above and the lenses are quite good.

1 upvote
tecnoworld
By tecnoworld (10 months ago)

The reputation is also made by sites like this one. It's evident that they don't want samsung to have a reputation.

Comment edited 22 seconds after posting
1 upvote
Peter K Burian
By Peter K Burian (9 months ago)

Samsung never gets much coverage in North America on any e-zine.

0 upvotes
peevee1
By peevee1 (9 months ago)

"The sensor is much better than every mft/ft sensor, except the newest Pens for 600$ and above "

Actually, E-PM2 is just $400.

0 upvotes
mad marty
By mad marty (9 months ago)

my prices are vat. included.

In Germany the e-pm2 is 420€ = 537$ but it's indeed under 600$.
It's still only an alternative to the nx1000 if you need high iso ooc jpeg, that's the weak point of the Samsung, compared to the new pens.

Comment edited 3 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Teru Kage
By Teru Kage (10 months ago)

The OM-D E-M5 is a fine camera, but for a lot less you can have nearly the same performance in the E-PL5. People looking into the < $1K category probably value image quality over weather sealing and 5-axis IBIS.

1 upvote
jennyrae
By jennyrae (10 months ago)

poor choices. I have better list selection than this.

3 upvotes
ksgant
By ksgant (10 months ago)

Then feel free to share with the rest of the class.

14 upvotes
CarVac
By CarVac (10 months ago)

I'm on a trip now. The most common cameras I see are the 60D and the EM-5 in a distant second: Almost as many 60D's as Rebels put together.

1 upvote
MikeCanon
By MikeCanon (10 months ago)

Nice list.

0 upvotes
l_d_allan
By l_d_allan (10 months ago)

Rather disappointing ... seems like not much more than a list of cameras in ascending order of price. I infer there was some kind of threshold "overall score", or perhaps those cameras receiving silver and or gold rating.

At a minimum, the article should have had the DPR "overall score" in the main body of the article, like the Canon 60D had an overall score of 79%.

3 upvotes
tecnoworld
By tecnoworld (10 months ago)

Yes, the most biased list I ever saw.

1 upvote
Aleo Veuliah
By Aleo Veuliah (10 months ago)

Panasonics Lumix are the best offers.

0 upvotes
Peter KT Lim
By Peter KT Lim (10 months ago)

Why you say that? Like to listen from you.

0 upvotes
George Veltchev
By George Veltchev (10 months ago)

indeed ...for kids !

3 upvotes
Neodp
By Neodp (10 months ago)

No; because you can't fix the DOF issues of smaller sensors, and the MFT lens prices are ludicrous, for the comparable lens qualities. Combined with the fact that none go in your pocket, anyway, it's a steep price to pay, for just some, better weight and size advantage. Since a used DSLR has better quality, a used DSLR is a better total value, than a new MFT, at these system prices. Even while bigger, some DSLR's, and certain primes, are not very "big".

Don't get me wrong. We need affordable, full frame (35mm size, FF, or FX), MIRRORLESS *systems* cameras (also more built-in lens optimized units; in parallel), and further progression, with those improvements. Canikon is missing the boat!

I used to say, the ultra zoom market desperately needs to use the micro four-third sensor; at a minimum. Those need APS-C at minimum, and system cams, need FF, at a minimum! Regardless, of how you are being manipulated, there is zero reason; that they can't be very affordable! Not, as priced today.

Comment edited 4 minutes after posting
2 upvotes
Neodp
By Neodp (10 months ago)

Keep in mind:

I'm referencing desired bokeh. You do give up some of that, with smaller sensors.

By pocket, I mean tight jeans. What MFT does that? Then what's the point.

The best, truly pock-able cameras, currently, compromise; too far. I'm not saying it's bad to use one; where you would not have anything else. I'm saying pocket camera's are no where near the best IQ. I've been there, and done that. My best pocket cam, personal choice is film(XA) LOL, and that's unfortunate. Technology needs huge leaps, with the pocket cam. They are definitely not worth their premium, and that's my view.

...and no, you don't need a tiny sensor, for telephoto; because you could selectively (center) crop a bigger sensor, and do far better. Especially in less that perfect light; which is almost all the time. Of course, larger sensors make wide angle easier, as well.

FF mirror-less does not require the excessive flange-back distance, and helps with the size, of matched system lenses.

1 upvote
Neodp
By Neodp (10 months ago)

...Consider the old Olympus XA film camera, 35mm(actual focal) lens, FF (35mm film size) full coverage, and at a fast f/2.8 (better than f/2.8 on a APS-C). That lens is barely there(almost doesn't even protrude), and is extremely high in quality, built-in prime. It's only major critic, is a little barrel, and that's already proved, easy to transparently auto-process, if it were digital. Why not?

http://stevelongphoto.smugmug.com/Portfolio/Olympus-XA-Canon-A1000IS/i-4cxvdFT/0/M/CLR_2408-M.jpg

Comment edited 4 times, last edit 10 minutes after posting
1 upvote
Neodp
By Neodp (10 months ago)

I'll give you better video; but these are mainly still cameras. DSLR's do have Jello-vids, and that's another reason; that we should already have, mirror-less FF systems, and new system lenses(primes for me) to AFFORD-ABLY choose.

But no, we get "M", and "C-mount" foolishness. WRONG! They only stand to prove, Canikon went the wrong way.

The best of all worlds is full-frame, mirror-less SYSTEMS. Where is it? Sony? LOL! No. The RX1 should tell you why. If Sony takes the lead, we are all toast. The only reason we see leaps from Sony, is they are currently not in the lead. We should beware a Sony sensor monopoly. Don't say I didn't warn you.

1 upvote
Neodp
By Neodp (10 months ago)

I assume you already know, larger sensors offer better color, and that's an IQ priority. Not to mention, lesser noise, to boot.

Comment edited 12 seconds after posting
1 upvote
Briwil
By Briwil (9 months ago)

Boo, boo! Boo everything Neodp has to say, stop writing, no one, other than me apparently, is reading your insanely long and negative comments.

1 upvote
ak1981
By ak1981 (10 months ago)

I hope my A-57 also make space in it but never the less A-65 is there which is pretty similar. It made me happy.

2 upvotes
AMM66
By AMM66 (9 months ago)

I would imagine that at least part of the reason it is not on the list is because it has been discontinued. I love my a-57, too, and wish I had bought another body before they discontinued them--just in case....

0 upvotes
v_lestat
By v_lestat (10 months ago)

@underdog 3000

The omd like it or not is one of the if not THE best camera on this list.

Who ever said this list is for deals.
You are very nieve to believe that a deal means its on sale.
A deal is value for the dollar and frankly if I wasn't so vested in my current gear I would have owned an omd long ago.

And you show your invalidity by saying the omd @ $1000 is the original retail.
Wow... Dead wrong... Go home and read some more.

3 upvotes
sportyaccordy
By sportyaccordy (10 months ago)

Lol how????

0 upvotes
Low Budget Dave
By Low Budget Dave (10 months ago)

The OMD is a good camera, but a set of compromises, just like every camera. The kit lens does not stand up well to the competition in the same price range, and predictive autofocus is average at best.

If you put on the stunning Oly 45mm lens, you can take some great portraits, but then you could put a nice lens on the K5 as well.

The video out of the OMD is better than anything except the Sony, but the Sony is visibly better, especially at low light, or with zoom lenses.

The Canon and Nikon entries in the list are outstanding all-around cameras, and take a variety of lenses that you could never get for your OMD.

If I were starting over with no lenses, I would get the K5, since it has a set of features that match and beat the OMD at its own game: Triple axis IS, high speed AF, pentaprism, weatherproof, great color at super high ISO, DNG RAW files, huge selection of lenses, and so on.

The only downside of the K5 is that the video is terrible. But every camera is a compromise.

3 upvotes
v_lestat
By v_lestat (10 months ago)

Samsung Samsung Samsung
Oh dear lord you people crying Samsung have no idea what on earth you are doing.
If Samsung made a good camera at any price it would be on a list some where of must have cameras.
But it's not.
Not here
Not there
Not anywhere
I own a lot of Samsung gear (phones tv's and more) but I would NEVER buy a Samsung camera because they are garbage and are destroyed by nearly everything on the market in its vertical.
There are even p-n-s cameras better than the NX cameras.

Wow you kids should really use a GOOD camera before call dp review the names you have and imply the childish things you have.

So is DXo mark worthless too?

Show me one Samsung camera on their site anywhere near the caliber of these cameras.

Comment edited 56 seconds after posting
4 upvotes
HendeHoq
By HendeHoq (10 months ago)

http://www.dxomark.com/index.php/Cameras/Camera-Sensor-Ratings/List-view
On dxomark site Samsung NX20 better then
SLT-A65
Olympus OM-D E-M5
Canon EOS 60D
Canon EOS 650D
Panasonic Lumix DMC GX1

So is DXo mark worthless?

0 upvotes
tecnoworld
By tecnoworld (10 months ago)

Nx20 has been tested by dxo mark and got great score. Nx300 is definitely better. Try to test them before speaking.

4 upvotes
starwolfy
By starwolfy (10 months ago)

I remember not so long a ago many people were saying: I'll never buy a Toyota because they are garbage cars. Now guess what is the number 1 brand in the world ?
That comment about Samsung cameras is kind of idiotic. Samsung camera, despite being the "best at something" are very nice overall cameras at a decent price.

4 upvotes
Low Budget Dave
By Low Budget Dave (10 months ago)

Depends what you are looking for. If you are looking for a small 300g camera to carry around, an ASPC sensor or bigger, hybrid AF, touchscreen, 1/6000 shutter speed, and changeable lenses, then the only camera you can buy with those specs is the Samsung NX300.

Period. That's then end of the list. Samsung NX300.

Those are not obscure features either. Those are features that every camera manufacturer is running in their advertisements.

You don't like the color? Well, buy yourself a copy of Lightroom (or rent Photoshop), and play with the colors all you want.

Don't like the picture quality? Well, then, don't buy it. But don't sit here and pretend that no one should buy it just because you don't like it. Other people like it just fine.

4 upvotes
AussieBarb
By AussieBarb (10 months ago)

I invested way too much into the NX11, gave up on it (with a large hole in my pocket) and brought on OMD and I'me very, very happy. I'll keep the Samsung lenses because I'm hoping that they'll improve and make the equivalent of todays OMD in the next year or so - maybe it's wishful thinking on my behalf though!

0 upvotes
jennyrae
By jennyrae (10 months ago)

strong statement made by someone with no real clue and affected by brand bias. best idea to know product before open mouth.

3 upvotes
tecnoworld
By tecnoworld (10 months ago)

Starwolfy: you are perfectly right. The difference, though, is that the bias towards samsung cameras is very strong. They already are up to or better than their closest competitors, but see hoew the things go. In this biased list, no nx is mentioned. On this site, the nx20 was not reviewed. The nx300 has been out for three months now. Will we see a fair review? Or will we see first, say, a fuji x-m1 review?

The nx300 is so much better than the x-m1, specs wise, that it should score - at least - 5 points better.

4 upvotes
jtmon
By jtmon (10 months ago)

"I remember not so long a ago many people were saying: I'll never buy a Toyota because they are garbage cars. Now guess what is the number 1 brand in the world ?"

And do you think this just happened because people like you said something? Of course not, THEY IMPROVED THEIR QUALITY AND VALUE. When Samsung does that then you can talk but right now you are trying to equate the two and totally ignoring WHY Toyota is that way now. Rocket Science people, it's all Rocket Science and SOOOOO hard to understand these basic things right?

0 upvotes
HendeHoq
By HendeHoq (10 months ago)

Why buy yourself a copy of Lightroom? There is a copy of Lightroom in Samsung NX300 Kit. Enjoy.

0 upvotes
Yvan/G2
By Yvan/G2 (10 months ago)

With the arrival of the NX300, Samsung has made it to the major league. Read the many reviews about it. They all tell you that this product is awesome. You'll be amazed at the features, the quality of the product, of the photos and the videos that it produces. YouTube has also many photo and video samples. I would not hesitate a second to choose it over all of the cameras in this comparison test.

3 upvotes
tecnoworld
By tecnoworld (10 months ago)

Yvan: you've seen the light :-) jokes apart, I agree that nx300 is better than all the cameras listed here. And not only than those.

2 upvotes
peevee1
By peevee1 (9 months ago)

HendeHoq, Samsung is WORSE than E-M5 where it counts - high ISO. Who cares about an extra bit in "color depth", 22+ bits is way more than enough (DxO themselves say even 20 bit constitute excellent).
In the similar cameras, NX200 is ISO 618, E-PM2 ISO 932 - not so small difference.
But yeah, it is better than Canon. Everything is better than Canon these days.

0 upvotes
DSHAPK
By DSHAPK (9 months ago)

if canon is so bad, why do they sell such a boatload of cameras?

0 upvotes
Underdog 3000
By Underdog 3000 (10 months ago)

I also am confused to the addition of the OM-D and G6. Both excellent cameras in their own regard I am sure.
Both are priced at the original manufacturers suggested retail price.
Where is the deal.
Sometime I think DPR puts out stuff like this just to see if we are following along.

Comment edited 22 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
CrashE3
By CrashE3 (10 months ago)

This is not a list of "deals".. it is a list of the writers favorite cameras under $1000.

8 upvotes
TWIZEEL
By TWIZEEL (10 months ago)

I always laughing how to marketing people tryed to screw the buyers brain.
....The Nikon D5200 replaces the D5100, a camera that was very popular among amateur .....
I did most of my Real Estate money with these camera :)) Like it 'cause very handy flipping screen.

4 upvotes
happypoppeye
By happypoppeye (10 months ago)

If the EM-5 is $1000 why is it on a list for the best under $1000 ...and the only one that is over $1000 with a lens.

9 upvotes
Timmbits
By Timmbits (10 months ago)

that is what I was saying.

surely they could have slipped in a NX300, nx1100 to give Samsung representation, or the EPL5 which is an Olympus with the same sensor and that fits the price criteria.

2 upvotes
mytake
By mytake (10 months ago)

@ happypoppeye
Check Amazon for pricing...$899 body...$999 w/kit. Being an older man, and set in my ways, I like to check things out before I speak...cause thats the way I've always done it. Koo koo k'joob...

By happypoppeye (5 days ago)

"The majority of old men have closed minds ...won't try anything new and think the way they have been shooting most of their lives is THE best way because, well, thats what they have done."

Comment edited 3 minutes after posting

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 14 minutes after posting
2 upvotes
Neodp
By Neodp (10 months ago)

Well in that case, also check older, and better IQ cameras, that cost far less. Starting, with refurbs.

0 upvotes
peevee1
By peevee1 (9 months ago)

"If the EM-5 is $1000 why is it on a list for the best under $1000"

Because even at release MSRP it was $999, which is under $1000. :) And now actually the body can be found for $850-870.

0 upvotes
Eskilsson
By Eskilsson (10 months ago)

If this is about "most bang for the buck", I would have Panasonic G5 instead of G6. In the matter of image quality, it`s hard to see some difference between thoose...And the G5 is a lot cheaper now..

4 upvotes
Impulses
By Impulses (10 months ago)

I think it's about coming close to $1K, tho the GX1 and OMD go significantly over/under! IQ may be the same between the G5/6 but the latter does have more than a few usability improvements that a lot of people would value. It's bound to drop in price by the end of the year if they actually release a GX1 replacement (with a GH3 sensor??). Then again I think Panasonic said the 6 series would complement rather than replace the 5, maybe they're looking to stabilize their lineup and pricing for once? Who knows...

1 upvote
BurkPhoto
By BurkPhoto (10 months ago)

If you care about recording video at all, the principle reason to get the G6 over the G5 is the addition of the external microphone input. No self-respecting videographer would use the mics built into one of these cameras for anything but background ambience.

1 upvote
al_in_philly
By al_in_philly (10 months ago)

What about the (insert name of camera here _________) ?

1 upvote
toomanycanons
By toomanycanons (10 months ago)

D5100.

2 upvotes
jtrickey
By jtrickey (10 months ago)

Nathebeach: You're right, Fuji lenses are a bit pricey, but most reviewers are saying the prices are justified.

Zeiss has recently released two very nice looking lenses which are full autofocus lenses and which look exceptional. Fuji will have more.

jtrickey

1 upvote
Nathebeach
By Nathebeach (10 months ago)

Zeiss. Wow and I was thinking Sigma. On the other hand I have heard all the same great feedback on the Fuji's. Maybe having two great lenses is better than a handful of mediocre ones.

2 upvotes
Benarm
By Benarm (10 months ago)

RX100

5 upvotes
Combatmedic870
By Combatmedic870 (10 months ago)

Its not a mirrorless or a dslr....Go troll somewhere else.

14 upvotes
JONNO G
By JONNO G (10 months ago)

I would add pentax k30 and k50, and olympus epl5
Pentax k30 with 18-135mm wr lens is $849 Canadian!

10 upvotes
johnami
By johnami (10 months ago)

Considering how many people read this site in continental europe, it's a pity you can't give prices in euros as well..............................Think international if you want to be international........

12 upvotes
guinness2
By guinness2 (10 months ago)

+1
More than in UK ?

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
1 upvote
ianp5a
By ianp5a (10 months ago)

Yes. It makes you question the quality of the reports when they blunder like this.

Comment edited 45 seconds after posting
1 upvote
peevee1
By peevee1 (9 months ago)

With some European prices, it is cheaper to fly to New York and try and buy a whole bunch of cameras and lenses directly in on of the Manhattan camera stores (A or B). :)

2 upvotes
Combatmedic870
By Combatmedic870 (10 months ago)

I think A samsung NX camera should have been mentioned atleast.

http://www.amazon.com/Samsung-NX300-Digital-Camera-18-55mm/dp/B00COZRKCK/ref=sr_1_8?ie=UTF8&qid=1372528144&sr=8-8&keywords=nx300

I have read nothing but great reviews about the NX300. It with the 30mm F2 is a very nice little combo.

I dont own an NX camera. I just feel they should have been mentioned. Or atleast the nx300 that is actually a very good camera.

12 upvotes
tecnoworld
By tecnoworld (10 months ago)

Exactly. It's the best camera in its segment (and also in many others).

But most of the ppl seem to just don't care.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
7 upvotes
Combatmedic870
By Combatmedic870 (10 months ago)

Seems like it has to be EVF compatible in order to have any mention.

I dont know, I feel that they should have atleast get some type of mention.

The last FW they released turned the nx300 into a beast.

They were the first company to produce a aps-c mirrorless camera.

Comment edited 47 seconds after posting
4 upvotes
tecnoworld
By tecnoworld (10 months ago)

A nx300 with same "rangefinder" form factor and enbedded high res evf (2+ mp) or even better hybrid vf, would be the best mirrorless camera on the market, imo. If they also include ibis, then no other aps-c camera (and of course no smaller sensored one) - also non mirrorless - could be comparable.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 1 minute after posting
3 upvotes
BJL
By BJL (10 months ago)

ILC = interchangeable lena cameras which obviously covers DSLRs too, so it isa poor replacement for CSC or MILC or my favorite, EVIL. With Olympus, Panasonic amd Sony all at times using "Compact System Camera" when referring to their MFT or NEX products, I do not think that DPReview alone has the power to "forcibly retire" that naming.

0 upvotes
Underdog 3000
By Underdog 3000 (10 months ago)

I thought ILC meant interchangeable lens compact.
Thanks for the info.

1 upvote
Gesture
By Gesture (10 months ago)

I think Compact System Camera is the best way to go and less tongue-typing. See that used on many retailer sites.

0 upvotes
sensibill
By sensibill (10 months ago)

Omission of cheap SLT models such as the A57 is odd, given the broad lens assortment and quite low price vs. the Nikon and Canon low to mid DSLR options.

The inclusion of models that obviously are NOT "under $1000" like the OM-D is similarly confusing. I don't see why body-only pricing qualifies for a list like this.

On the other hand, it's refreshing to see the ridiculous 'CSC' term being forcibly retired. ILC isn't perfect, but better.

5 upvotes
flipmac
By flipmac (10 months ago)

A new E-M5 w/ 14-42mm is $999 on Amazon... could be found cheaper if you look around.

1 upvote
Marvol
By Marvol (10 months ago)

Body-only makes sense to me, so as to not punish/reward manufacturers that stick on a good/crap quality kit lens.

This way gives a good idea about the body quality and then you can find the lens you like to go with it.

0 upvotes
Adrian Van
By Adrian Van (10 months ago)

The only constructive criticism is for next time, perhaps dpreview should add at least one camera from each of the main camera manufacturers to keep all fans happy. So Samsung and Fuji should have made the list (for bodies at least) which are under 1000 for ILC. These are great cameras as well, purchased by many.

Maybe update this to top 12 instead of top 10?
Fuji X-E1 body $899. or X-M1 with 16-50 kit lens at $799. and Samsung NX 11 with kit lens at $399. in my area in Toronto at retail stores.

4 upvotes
peevee1
By peevee1 (9 months ago)

"The only constructive criticism is for next time, perhaps dpreview should add at least one camera from each of the main camera manufacturers to keep all fans happy. So Samsung and Fuji should have made the list (for bodies at least) which are under 1000 for ILC. These are great cameras as well, purchased by many."

Not so many. None in the top 20 sold MILC cameras last year.

0 upvotes
Marty4650
By Marty4650 (10 months ago)

I think the reason that NEX and M4/3 were on this list.... and NX, Fuji X and Nikon 1 weren't.... is that the former have the most complete lens catalogs.

Fuji, Samsung and Nikon make very nice MILC cameras, but if you buy one you will be somewhat limited in your lens options.

4 upvotes
tecnoworld
By tecnoworld (10 months ago)

Marty, Samsung NX system has the following lens lineup:

primes:
10mm f3.5 fisheye pancake
16mm f2.4 ultra wide pancake
20mm f2.8 wide pancake
30mm f2.0 pancake
45mm f1.8 2D/3D lens (not pancake, but quite small) (9 blades)
60mm f2.8 1:1 macro OIS
85mm f1.4 ultrafast portrait lens (9 blades)

zooms:
12-24 wide zoom
18-55 OIS
20-50 compact zoom
50-200 OIS
18-200 OIS

So I think it's quite a lineup. Of course some fl are missing (135mm f2 as a prime lens, a fast zoom) but I think there are plenty, possibly more than NEX.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
16 upvotes
Nathebeach
By Nathebeach (10 months ago)

Aren't the Fuji lenses pricey? Also do you know what kind of third part lenses are made for the Fuji's?

0 upvotes
RadPhoto
By RadPhoto (10 months ago)

So you think Sony NEX has more lenses than Fuji X?

I wish there was an "unLike" button :-)

Comment edited 26 seconds after posting
6 upvotes
sensibill
By sensibill (10 months ago)

NX lens system isn't far off NEX, and better overall quality for the most part, and cheaper. A better question is why SLT Alpha mount cameras like the A57 were left off, with a quite robust Sony A and Minolta AF library to choose from.

3 upvotes
Impulses
By Impulses (10 months ago)

There's one on the list... The SLT-A65.

2 upvotes
stick25
By stick25 (10 months ago)

Lenses for sale by one(very popular) Internet retailer by mount:

Canon EF-M (4)
Fujifilm X Mount (16)
Micro Four Thirds (61)
Nikon 1 (17)
Pentax Q (5)
Ricoh GXR (3)
Samsung NX (32)
Sony E-mount (NEX) (34)

3 upvotes
Treeshade
By Treeshade (10 months ago)

m4/3 has the best lens lineup among MILC. The NEX E-mount lineup isn't that great, but NEX is compatible (at least AF) with A-mount lens with adapters.

I think NX could be on the list. Fuji may have price problem here. Nikon 1 lens system is too limited. (F-mount adapter is just stupid on small sensor.)

And EOS-M actually could be the Canon's NEX with decent Canon lens support but please... make a body that works.

3 upvotes
Timmbits
By Timmbits (10 months ago)

they are obviously biased Marty, because the omdem5 doesn't even meet the price criteria with any lens, and without a lens, it doesn't even fit the definition of a camera.

the exclusion of the X-M1 is probably a timing thing - intro date versus when the article was worked on.

the NX have some so-so lenses, and some good IQ lenses... at least they have most bases covered good IQ lenses. NEX lenses have been, on the other hand, widely criticized by the community. now tell us with a straight face that these choices aren't biased.

3 upvotes
Marty4650
By Marty4650 (10 months ago)

Yes.... I'd say they stretched it a bit by including a $995 camera body in a group of "cameras with lenses for $1,000."

However, you can get an OM-D with the 14-42mm lens for around $1050, so it really wasn't that much of a stretch. Most of those other cameras come with the cheapest kit lenses too.

As far as the lens availability issue... here's my list of lenses that exist (and not necessarily those offered for sale by any particular vendor):

M4/3................34 lenses
Sony NEX..........15 lenses
Samsung NX......10 lenses
Fuji X.................9 lenses
Nikon 1..............8 lenses
Pentax Q............6 lenses
Canon M.............2 lenses

Of course, no list is ever complete, because new lenses are being announced every day. But I think this list does demonstrate what a huge lead M4/3 has.

Comment edited 4 times, last edit 3 minutes after posting
2 upvotes
Gesture
By Gesture (10 months ago)

I think Samsung has the most complete and well-thought out lens lineup. With 24mm, 30mm, 45mm, 90mm, 120mm equivalents.

1 upvote
Marty4650
By Marty4650 (10 months ago)

If that is the most complete and well-thought out lineup, then just remember that M4/3 offers 16mm, 24mm, 28mm, 34mm, 38mm, 40mm, 50mm, 60mm, 90mm, 120mm, and 150mm equivalent prime lenses. With an 85mm f/1.2 and 300mm f/2.8 scheduled to arrive this year from Panasonic.

Making it a somewhat more complete and well thought out lineup.

2 upvotes
tecnoworld
By tecnoworld (10 months ago)

Marty: of course the m4/3 system, including many brands, has more kenses than samsung. But samsung nevertheless has the mist fl covered, as I showed in an earlier post. Besides it has a bigger sensor, in the latest iteration it has hybrid focus for ultra fast af and many other features. Not including it is pure bias.

1 upvote
peevee1
By peevee1 (9 months ago)

NEX does not have long zooms, or fast zooms.

0 upvotes
HendeHoq
By HendeHoq (10 months ago)

Canon? Panasonic? Sony SLT-A65? Are you serious?

4 upvotes
Marvol
By Marvol (10 months ago)

No, are YOU serious?

0 upvotes
gkreth
By gkreth (10 months ago)

I would have included the Pentax K-30: Most of the specs of the K-5, plus newer AF system, focus peaking, exposure control during video capture. Currently $469 with free shipping at Tristate - I just bought one!

8 upvotes
Total comments: 276
12