Accessory Review: Phottix Odin TTL Flash Trigger for Canon

Phottix Odin TTL Flash Trigger for Canon
$329 / £267 www.phottix.com

The Phottix Odin is a wireless TTL flash trigger system that operates via radio frequency. At $329.99, the Odin's price tag may seem a tad steep over the competition, but it features several key advantages that make it worth the ride. The most prominent advantage of the Odin's TCU (Transmitter and Control Unit) is its large LCD screen, which displays exposure stop increments, TTL/M modes and various other options that are linked directly to the flash and camera menu system. This is something that most wireless flash trigger units lack.

The Phottix Odin's LCD screen is also backlit, which is a lifesaver during night shoots. In addition to a friendly LCD menu interface, the Phottix Odin is blessed with an intuitive grouping of tactile menu buttons that govern controls such as flash head zoom, test light, modelling flash and second curtain sync, to name a few. Thanks to the LCD/button combination, the Odin is easy to acclimate to right out of the box. It's worth noting that most of the Odin's competitors lack LCD screens and offer limited control over camera and flash options. 

For this review, our Odin was used with a Canon EOS 5D Mark III and paired with a Canon Speedlite 580EXII unit. 

The Phottix Odin wireless TTL flash system for Canon features an intuitive interface that communicates with camera and flash menu systems. Mounting directly to the hot shoe, the unit is nice and compact. Here it is working its magic on an old Canon EOS 50D.

Another benefit of the Phottix Odin's system is that it operates via a 2.4GHz radio frequency with a range of over 100 meters (though I was able to get it to work from up to 15 meters further away). This is an advantage when compared with Canon's finicky infrared systems, for example, which in my experience require close proximity between flash and trigger. As of this spring, Canon does now finally offer a radio wireless system, but at around $470, the Canon ST-E3-RT is significantly more expensive than the Odin (and currently only works with the high-end 600-EX-RT Speedlite flash).

Adding to the Odin's versatility, the TCU and receiver combo can host up to three seperate groups of flashes (A, B and C) in four different channels. While we've seen greater numbers of groups and channels available on other competing models, this represents significant versatility. 

Not once did the Odin falter and break connection at longer distances during my testing. The unit also fired consistently 100% of the time, never once missing a beat.But perhaps the greatest thing about the Phottix Odin, on top of the fact that it's a full TTL/ETTL system that works really well, is that nearly all of the Speedlite's options and controls can be controlled via the Odin TCU. This includes shooting in full Manual mode with 1/3-stop adjustments. The Odin allows A:B ratio shooting and accommodates an adjustable zoom range of 24-105mm.

In most cases, there was no need to fiddle with the Speedlite flash's controls at all, for most of it could be done from within the single Odin TCU, including camera system options like FEB (Flash Exposure Bracketing). Of course, you could configure your flashes manually at different exposure increments and speeds, but when you want TTL, the Phottix Odin does really well.

Phottix also shows some love for the Nikon crowd with the Odin Nikon system. Note the USB port for firmware upgrades and 6.3mm port for strobe connectivity. The most recent Canon firmware upgrade brought 1/3-step tinkering to the table.

In terms of build quality, the Phottix Odin is fairly rugged, yet compact enough to hide inside a small camera bag pocket. The TCU and Reciever each run on two AA batteries and contain USB ports for firware upgrades. Phottix customer support appears very responsive, and only recently the company released a recent firmware update that addressed the original unit's lack of 1/3-step increment adjustment in Manual mode after floods of emails from Odin owners. Something I'd like to see added via firmware would be the ability to control both Manual and Multiflash modes in the camera system menu via the Odin TCU, so hopefully we'll see that down the road. There's even an included cable and 6.3mm adapter to connect the reciever to a studio strobe.

Summing Up

The bottom line here is that the Phottix Odin is one of the best wireless TTL flash triggers on the market. The unit performs flawlessly at ridiculous distances, never missing a beat during my testing. Its highly intuitive LCD/Menu system and integration with camera and flash system menus make it a bonefide snap to use. The versatility of three separate groups and four different channels with A:B ratio, TTL/Manual, second curtain sync, zoom and other options governable right from the TCU itself is a definite time and headache saver. With impressive customer support and frequent firmware upgrades, it's hard to find any major flaws in the Phottix Odin. 

If you desire a reliable, dependable and intuitive wireless TTL flash trigger system that can operate flawlessly from football field lengths away, the Phottix Odin is certainly worth a look. It's a little more pricy than some of its competitors, but considering the feature set it offers excellent value for money.  

What we like: Exceptional interface, 'plug-and-play' ease of use, versatile functionality, proven performance, great customer service with firmware updates, solid construction. Canon and Nikon compatible versions.

What we don't like: We have to nitpick here, but again, we'd like to see a firmware update that enables Manual/Multiflash control from within the Odin TCU. Also, at this price Phottix could have added a shutter trigger as well, which would make this model the ultimate trigger system. One last thing: how about other camera brand compatibility and a list of compatible third-party flashes?


This product is available on Amazon.com 


Mike Perlman is a freelance photographer and writer, based in Bar Harbor, Maine. After a spell reviewing camcorders at Camcorderinfo.com, Mike moved to infoSync World as the Senior Photography Editor, before taking up a role at TechnoBuffalo.com as the head of the Photography department. These days, Mike runs his own photography business and contributes to DP Review between shoots.

The views and opinions expressed in this article are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions held by dpreview.com or any affiliated companies.

Comments

Total comments: 85
Wilmar Boer
By Wilmar Boer (2 weeks ago)

Does anyone know if it's possible to mix Canon and Nikon flashes by using a mix of receivers?

I own both brands. Suppose I buy a Odin for Canon as a transmitter on my 5Dmkiii and a mix of Nikon and Canon receivers. Is it possible to use my SB900 and SB800 flashes and my 540EX flash with my 5D body that way (including TTL)?

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
0 upvotes
uchin sharingan
By uchin sharingan (5 months ago)

the biggest downside on the PW is the hotshoe, its plastic!
for those who doubt and complaint, you guys never touch Odin on your own hand, don't you?

0 upvotes
JeepDaddy
By JeepDaddy (Jan 30, 2013)

Does anyone know if the Odin can be controlled by via the camera?

0 upvotes
RicardoPhotos
By RicardoPhotos (Oct 6, 2012)

What I haven't seen anyone touch on here is the strobe-specific receivers that PocketWizard makes. Being able to control power and use HSS on an Einstein with the transmitter on the camera is pretty awesome. So far Odin doesn't provide any modules for that.

PocketWizard is awesome for all that they do, but Odin is very impressive. If Odin comes out with receivers for strobes that allow power control & HSS, PocketWizard could be in big trouble.

0 upvotes
SanDiegoICE
By SanDiegoICE (Sep 26, 2012)

Loved my Phottix Odin TTL remote flash triggers for Canon, until two of them suddenly stopped working with very little use.

Sure, stuff happens, but Phottix isn't responding to my emails about getting them repaired/replaced under warranty. Thus right now they're just two over-priced paper weights, and I'm wondering how long the other two will continue to function. (Could lousy customer service be a cultural phenomenon?)

1 upvote
KBStudio
By KBStudio (Sep 17, 2012)

Just finished extensive tests on the Canon Odin and 4 receivers. Hardware consists of a 5DM2, 2-430EXs,1-430EX II, and a 580EX II. All features seemed to be behaving as advertised,HSS,Zoom,ETTL, except the misfires. If I try to shoot a quick sequence with my 5DM2, I will get one good exposure and after that on receiver or another will misfire. I have replaced batteries in both the speedlights and the receivers. This results in maybe two or three good exposures before the misfires begin again. The 580EX II seems to have the fewest misfires. I did get a six shot sequence without a misfire when I set the strobes to Manual and 1/128 power. All strobes and receivers were within 5-10 feet of the camera so it isn't a distance issue. It does appear that HSS adds to the number of misfires while Normal and Manual have fewer. I am using the latest firmware 1.20 and Sanyo Eneloop rechargeable batteries all freshly charged.

This is not the performance that was reviewed or advertised.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
0 upvotes
KBStudio
By KBStudio (Sep 20, 2012)

Further testing has shown that the Odins are working just fine. The misfires are a result of the slow recycling of the 430EX speedlights while in HSS mode.

2 upvotes
sunkenbranch
By sunkenbranch (Sep 13, 2012)

For those who are curious, The (Nikon) Nissin DI866 Mark II will not hi speed sync with the ODIN. I could only get any kind of hi speed sync output with the flash improperly set to Manual, full power. The Nissin will hi speed sync when connected to the camera directly.

0 upvotes
sunkenbranch
By sunkenbranch (Sep 13, 2012)

Nikon ODIN- SB910, along with SB700 and Nissin DI866 Mark II. Range testing - This was an unscientific test, just went outside along the road with batteries that came with the ODIN and some Eneloops right out of the package. Interesting results, at around 100 meters sometimes I could see preflash but got no output, other times I got good flash, other times no flash. When tilting the camera to portrait orientation with the ODIN master unit off to the side, I could not get the flashes to go off at that range. I suspect it is due to the polarity of the built in antenna. Anyhow, to get reliable all three flashes going off no matter how I held the camera, I had to be between 100 to 135 feet away. Which seems real world, i.e., not fresh batteries, middle of your session type of situation. Sill fine. For those who don't like the ODINS, just set your flash to TTL and let the ODIN master do the adjustments. I will retest range sometime with all eneloops fully charged.

0 upvotes
Dave Seeley
By Dave Seeley (Sep 10, 2012)

I have 8x 550ex flash units on the Phottix Odin system, and couldn't be happier. I bought it when my primary cam was the 5D2, and now use em on my 5D3. Takes a bit for me to shoot a couple of test shots and determine flash group levels above and below ttl, then any minor adjustments during shooting can be made via the flash adjustment compensation on camera. Love em. Never had any prior radio trigger system, so can't compare to those.

0 upvotes
Toby Visuals
By Toby Visuals (Sep 9, 2012)

Own a Odin for several months. Works flawless just missing the shutter trigger.
5D Mark II, 580EX II, 430EX II

0 upvotes
tongki
By tongki (Sep 9, 2012)

if only dpreview want to make some test against ST-E3,
they should put Quantum FreeXwire system at the first place,
as it is the first wireless flash system and Canon is just a follower like the rest

0 upvotes
plevyadophy
By plevyadophy (Sep 6, 2012)

PHOTTIX Odins are incompatible (at present) with SIX Canon cameras.
==========================================

Here's a copy of the email I received from PHOTTIX:

Hello:

Thanks for your email.

Yes, the 1D Mark II will work. The only cameras we have issue with are: 1D, 1Ds, G6, G12, G1x, 1Dx

Canon changes their camera/flash protocols from time to time. This happened when the EXII flashes were released - and again recently as well. The 650D, 5D Mark III and 1Dx all have new protocols. This is easy for Canon to accommodate - much less easy for us when trying to add all the protocols into one product.

If you need anything further please let me know.

Regards,
Steve

1 upvote
Jan_Shim
By Jan_Shim (Sep 8, 2012)

It's great to own Canon cameras 5D Mark II and PowerShot G11 that (are) completely compatible with the Odin system.

0 upvotes
Dave Seeley
By Dave Seeley (Sep 12, 2012)

Anyone know if the Odin's will be compatible with the new EOS M?

0 upvotes
elv
By elv (Sep 6, 2012)

I have been involved with beta testing and reviewing (and of course using) TTL radio triggers since the first options where available, and the Odins are definitely a standout because they are really very powerfull in terms of functions but also incredibly simple and trouble free to use. You can literally start working with them without even having seen an instruction manual.

They do still have have a few limitations to be aware of though, you can see more about that in my review here from a slightly different perspective -

http://flashhavoc.com/phottix-odin-ttl-trigger-review/
.

1 upvote
plevyadophy
By plevyadophy (Sep 5, 2012)

Just received a reply from PHOTTIX.

It appears that their product, contrary to the impression given, may work only with camera bodies that support ETTL-II, and not the original ETTL.

:o(

0 upvotes
DGWeiss
By DGWeiss (Sep 9, 2012)

That sounds odd to me, because I thought that E-TTL vs. E-TTL II was entirely in the camera, and that the flashes didn't know, or need to know, which system was in use.

I mean, a 550EX works with E-TTL II, doesn't it? Yet it predates E-TTL II.

I'd love to know why and in what way Canon modified the camera-to-flash protocol to accomodate E-TTL II, and how this causes problem for a system like the Phottix.

0 upvotes
audijam
By audijam (Sep 5, 2012)

i think it's time for DPREVIEW to launch a new test -
STE3 vs Pixel King vs Pocket Wizard...

you may add yongnuo to the list too. the other day i saw they came out with a new tranceiver as well but ain't quite sure about the specs. the old RF602/603 were like @%#@$#@%#@$ though

1 upvote
plevyadophy
By plevyadophy (Sep 5, 2012)

FAILURE!!
Well, this item isn't as good as it is claimed to be.
I have tried it TWICE, once with old firmware, and second time with new firmware. It failed to work on both occasions.
I was testing it with a 1D (Mark 1) and a 580 Mark II flash gun.
The list of problems:
~FEC that you set doesn't show in the viewfinder (as it does with the flash in the hotshoe)
~ FEC is not reported in the EXIF data during image playback
~ You can't use the transmitter (tx) to fire flashes at desired power level so as to take meter readings of individual lights. Instead, pressing the TEST button on the tx results in a very weak test pulse being fired irrespective of power output set on each flashgun. So you must trip shutter to get flash to fire at desired power.
~ Chnaging flashes to Manual Mode does not work
~ When tx zooms flash heads it causes error message on the flash after the flash has been fired.
~ Setting FEC on the tx has ZERO effect
~ Finally, EVERY shot taken results in GROSS overexposure

0 upvotes
audijam
By audijam (Sep 5, 2012)

1Ds Mark II is on your wish list...would you like to buy it from me?

0 upvotes
plevyadophy
By plevyadophy (Sep 5, 2012)

@audijam

Eh?

Comment edited 54 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
Dave Seeley
By Dave Seeley (Sep 10, 2012)

Canon 1D not supported by Phottix Odins

0 upvotes
XeroJay
By XeroJay (Sep 5, 2012)

"Canon does now finally offer a radio wireless system, but at around $470, the Canon ST-E3-RT is significantly more expensive"

What? Is anyone paying $470 for the ST-E3?! It's only $319 at BH!
Not to mention you literally get the receiver with any new Canon flash that you buy. I could see if someone has older bodies/flashes, the Odin would make sense. For anyone using the 5D3/1DX the Odin would seem a bit...old school.

1 upvote
Paul Donovan
By Paul Donovan (Sep 5, 2012)

"There are plenty of wireless TTL flash triggers on the market, making it difficult to find the ideal setup to meet your needs". Wouldn't there being plenty available on the market make it *easier* to find the ideal setup? More to choose from?

0 upvotes
Mike Perlman
By Mike Perlman (Sep 5, 2012)

If there were 27 different varieties of bananas at the supermarket, how would you be able to discern which breed was the tastiest? Wouldn't it be much easier if there were only three varieties of bananas to choose from?

0 upvotes
40d_dane
By 40d_dane (Sep 5, 2012)

How does the Odin handle flash recycling ? I have two 600EX-RT and a ST-E3-RT. Except for the 0.5-1 second that the Canon radio system add to the flash recycling time it does work quite well. But the unnecessary increase in recycle time is a real killer for me. Maybe I should just ditch the ST-E3-RT, get the Odin and one or two used 580 II's to supplement my 600's...

0 upvotes
Mike Perlman
By Mike Perlman (Sep 5, 2012)

It handles recycle time exceedingly well. I was able to fire repeatedly with no lag. You should see the Odin work the modeling flash--it's quite impressive.

0 upvotes
40d_dane
By 40d_dane (Sep 5, 2012)

Thanks Mike,
I'm also considering the Strato II to supplement the ST-E3-RT. My guess is that it's as reliable as the Odin and I pretty much know how I want my flashes set up in manual mode. I could get a set of Strato II's to do my current project and hope that Canon get a fix for the recycle delay. The Strato is significantly lower priced (I can get a Strato II transmitter and two receivers for the price of just one Odin receiver).

0 upvotes
Mike Perlman
By Mike Perlman (Sep 5, 2012)

The Stratos are good too, and they offer four groups as opposed to the Odin's three. For your setup, it sounds like the Stratos would suit you well.

0 upvotes
40d_dane
By 40d_dane (Sep 5, 2012)

I just did a 1:1 comparison once again: Shoe-mounted 600EX-RT on my 7D at 1/8 power with an external battery pack (not the CP-E4 as it is ridiculously overpriced). I can shoot at 8 fps without a single missed frame for at least 10 frames (I stop in order to stay avay from thermal issues). Then I repeated with the ST-E3-RT in the camera flash-shoe (still at 1/8 flash power). After 3 or 4 frames I get at least 4 black frames. The Canon radio flash system really isn't for action shooters. Canon support has been very unresponsive... so I will be ordering Stratos... sigh

0 upvotes
Toranaga
By Toranaga (Sep 5, 2012)

One thing that makes this kinda useless for some... You cant mount a flash on top of the trigger like with a TT5! In some situations I use both on- and offcamera flash and this makes that impossible.

0 upvotes
MAC
By MAC (Sep 5, 2012)

Agree and I wrote them and asked them and they responded they have no design plans to address

0 upvotes
Dave Seeley
By Dave Seeley (Sep 10, 2012)

True...no hot shoe on tope, and I suspect that it's the form factor of the transmitter that makes a hot shoe unworkable... I do think you can mount a hot shoe pass-through cable between camera and transmitter, to an off camera flash -hand held, or bracket mounted.
I have not personally tried this after researching it - because I decide to buy another receiver instead.

0 upvotes
gl2k
By gl2k (Sep 5, 2012)

The article says nothing about any high speed flash capabilities.
Pocket Wizard can do.

0 upvotes
Mike Perlman
By Mike Perlman (Sep 5, 2012)

It does have high-speed capability. More info is on the Phottix site.

0 upvotes
Dave Seeley
By Dave Seeley (Sep 10, 2012)

Yes on high speed sync.

0 upvotes
kff
By kff (Sep 5, 2012)

What a pity! They don't have version for Pentax ...

0 upvotes
qwertyasdf
By qwertyasdf (Sep 5, 2012)

Pentax has to blame themselves for this...

0 upvotes
Dave Seeley
By Dave Seeley (Sep 10, 2012)

I believe a Nikon version recently came out.... though I know a guy who switch from Canon to the D800, and says the Nikon Phottix system is not as care-free as the Canon.

0 upvotes
RCederholm
By RCederholm (Sep 5, 2012)

Love my Odin's for Canon. Works great with both my 430EX and 420EX. It is so great that one can use the older flashes with them. Just a great system.

That said, I do have a few gripes (one which is fairly well documented with users). The receiver unit is fairly large in the front and I find it difficult to use it for softboxes and get the flash head in the enclosed area. Usually have to turn the unit, which then negates the ability to use the zoom feature. Also, I've heard that the units send out a pre-flash which make it tough to use a meter. Lastly, as compared to the Canon unit, the transmitter sits quite high, which likely makes it easier to knock into things.

The stated negatives are things I can work with and I do truly love the system. It was a lifesaver when I had to shoot a wedding solo earlier this year and allowed me to get this shot within a 5 minute timeframe (which is all I had):

http://g2.img-dpreview.com/26DD05058D284775AAE6CDF5E0994960.jpg

0 upvotes
DGWeiss
By DGWeiss (Sep 9, 2012)

You mention the problem of the units emitting a pre-flash. If your'e in E-TTL mode they have to, by definition.

It would certainly be nice that if you're working strictly in manual mode, no preflashes would be emitted. At least that's how I would expect it to work.

0 upvotes
fotogloria
By fotogloria (Sep 5, 2012)

Here is my story.. I am a professional photographer with more than 18 years of experience and I tried everything else and finally bought Odin for my Canon 5D and 4 550EX combo. And ever since I bought Odin, I never missed any single shots because the flash was not firing. So far it is giving me 100% results with no issues. ETTL works like a charm... Accurate measurements. Distance is not a problem for me as I am always within their advertised range.

I have started with Radio Popper and they sent me 2 different sets of units for replacement and finally I sold that and got Pocket Wizard Flex TT series and even with them I had to get a replacement once but still was no use and finally I found these babies and I am married to them.. Permanently. If she decides to ditch me some how, I would get a clone of her from Phottix.. :) YES the review is right and it looks like an ad because that is the truth!!! ODIN ROCKS!!!

5 upvotes
gl2k
By gl2k (Sep 5, 2012)

your posts sounds like a paid ad.
"Oh darling, my life is so much better now since I'm using Odin."

2 upvotes
fotogloria
By fotogloria (Sep 5, 2012)

No I am not connected to Phottix at all. I am a happy customer and I just could not hide my happiness of using their system without any troubles. It is a great peace of mind for event photographers to not to worry about their flashes every now and then thinking if it fired or not. That too I had only bad experiences from other two major brands. And then moved on to this and it has been many many months and going good without any troubles. So please consider it as a true and honest opinion.

0 upvotes
Dave Seeley
By Dave Seeley (Sep 10, 2012)

I'll second fotogloria,
I've got the Odin and 8 receivers mounted on 8 Canon 550ex flash units. The 550ex has the same flash capability as the later units, and does not have issue with recycle that those had. It's a true work horse, and sells used for about $160. The Odin has been fantastic, and never an issue with recycle... In a studio setting, I will shoot pix about 1 second apart, for 20 or more shots. You can also use flash exposure compensation from the camera, and it adjusts the settings on the Odin globally. I love it!

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
0 upvotes
Ryan Gardner
By Ryan Gardner (Sep 5, 2012)

The main thing that the PocketWizards have over this at this point seems to be the hypersync (where you can push the sync speed a bit faster) or the optimized HSS (where you don't lose as much power going to HSS) ?

The main thing that the Odin has over PW's is that it has a display, which is definitely better than the dials on the EC-3.

At least this means getting used Flex TT5's might be cheaper soon for those of us who don't care to switch systems :)

0 upvotes
Olgierd
By Olgierd (Sep 5, 2012)

Yes, but so far Flex/Mini doesn't work with 5d3/1dx cameras nor 600 series speedlites. Plus range and accuracy still stinks. I have set and keeping it for now for my Alien Bees and 7d. Once I get ST-E3-RT i may look for cheaper triggers for studio and get rid of PWs.

0 upvotes
miklmar
By miklmar (Sep 5, 2012)

I can't find the Canon version on the website, only the Nikon. Trying to find out if the 550EX is compatible.

0 upvotes
Jan_Shim
By Jan_Shim (Sep 5, 2012)

Link to Phottix Odin for Canon http://www.phottixstore.com/store/phottix-odin-ttl-1.html though not specifically spelled out, it should work on all Canon flashes.

0 upvotes
miklmar
By miklmar (Sep 6, 2012)

Thanks

0 upvotes
Dave Seeley
By Dave Seeley (Sep 10, 2012)

Yes... I use 8x 550ex flash units on the Phottix Odin system. Works like a charm.

0 upvotes
Jan_Shim
By Jan_Shim (Sep 5, 2012)

I have a Phottix Odin transmitter each on two of my 5D Mark II that I use to trigger up to 4 Canon Speedlites. The best part about the Odin TTL system is that you no longer need to spend big bucks to buy the higher end Canon flashes for their Master/Slave capability. I work with any combination of 270EX, 430EX-II and 580EX flashes and I have flawless ETTL control with the Odin. You only need to determine if the particular flash gives you enough light for your work. http://is.gd/Yo2NaH

0 upvotes
METROMODEPHOTO
By METROMODEPHOTO (Sep 5, 2012)

anyone have any idea on the cost of this unit?

0 upvotes
SEBOUNET
By SEBOUNET (Sep 5, 2012)

in the yellow title 329$

0 upvotes
audijam
By audijam (Sep 5, 2012)

yes it is expensive damn you pixel makes good products and sucks the money out of my wallet...LOL!!! good job though!!!

0 upvotes
SEBOUNET
By SEBOUNET (Sep 4, 2012)

can we do high speed flash with this ?

0 upvotes
Mike Perlman
By Mike Perlman (Sep 4, 2012)

Yes, the system accommodates high-speed flash.

0 upvotes
Denton Taylor
By Denton Taylor (Sep 4, 2012)

An odd time for a review given that the ST-E3-RT is available for the same price.

0 upvotes
Barney Britton
By Barney Britton (Sep 4, 2012)

The point is though, that regardless of the price of the ST-E3-RT, you can only use it with one flashgun - the EX600 RT. A lot of photographers will be sticking with their older Canon flashes until there's a really compelling reason to make the (pricey) upgrade.

6 upvotes
Jan_Shim
By Jan_Shim (Sep 5, 2012)

Canon missed the boat and may depend on the next wave of photographers who have not yet invested in a million units of 580EX/II and lower models to benefit from the ST-E3-RT system. Beauty of the Phottix Odin is that as long you have a Canon E-TTL flash, everything from a tiny 270EX to 580EX-II will work.

I have not looked at the ST-E3-RT unit to determine it's user friendliness - good old buttons on the Odin receivers make Channel/Group selection so quick. Sometimes, high tech just slows/hampers productivity.

0 upvotes
Netfalls
By Netfalls (Sep 4, 2012)

I'm using the Phottix Odin for a while now.
I have tried most of the triggers on the market and the Odin is no PW competition but a PW killer.
Finally a reliable TTL trigger!
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JQQz90AvwMk

0 upvotes
Mike Perlman
By Mike Perlman (Sep 4, 2012)

It truly is a great system compared to the competition.

0 upvotes
PhotoKhan
By PhotoKhan (Sep 6, 2012)

"Odin is no PW competition but a PW killer."...wishful thinking is always funny.
From 05:15 onwards:
http://www.pocketwizard.com/inspirations/tutorials/pocketwizard_controltl_optimiz/
Do some f/1.8, f/2.8 1/2000, 1/5000 shots full daylight with the Odin and report back.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 1 minute after posting
0 upvotes
Netfalls
By Netfalls (Sep 24, 2012)

I do use the HSS quite often and the Odin performs much better than the PW.
Once you've used the Odin there is no turning back ;)

0 upvotes
uchin sharingan
By uchin sharingan (5 months ago)

Odin support HSS 1/8000.
i'm often shoot wide open f/1.8 on midday, no problem at all.
never fail. i start to addict to it.
say bye-bye to ND filter.

1 upvote
MUTURI KANINI
By MUTURI KANINI (3 months ago)

this is exactly the kind of info i needed.i am on the verge of getting the odin..do you have a link i can view of the 1.8 high sync images at day time.i would really appreciate

0 upvotes
69chevy
By 69chevy (Sep 4, 2012)

"Another benefit of the Phottix Odin's system is that it operates via a 2.4GHz radio frequency with a range of over 100 meters (though I was able to get it to work from up to 15 meters further away). "

Do you mean 165 meters?

Comment edited 29 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
Mike Perlman
By Mike Perlman (Sep 4, 2012)

Nope, it's slated for over 100 meters, but I got it to work at around 115-120 meters (approximately 15 meters over its spec.).

0 upvotes
uchin sharingan
By uchin sharingan (5 months ago)

already tested it.
it work far from it (from my experience) about 300+ meter.

0 upvotes
Daniel Roos
By Daniel Roos (Sep 4, 2012)

seems like a real rip off of Nikons SU-800
http://www.nital.it/experience/images/d5000-flash/big/16-d5000-cls.jpg

0 upvotes
Paul Pasco
By Paul Pasco (Sep 4, 2012)

SU-800 operates via infrared signals like Canon's and is not as reliable at distances or around corners. Odin is radio controlled so doesn't have those limitations

0 upvotes
Mike Perlman
By Mike Perlman (Sep 4, 2012)

True, radio frequency is superior to infrared in the world of wireless flash triggers.

0 upvotes
InTheMist
By InTheMist (Sep 4, 2012)

Kinda reads like a brochure, but I'm glad PW has some competition.

2 upvotes
9ine
By 9ine (Sep 4, 2012)

Yes, it is an advert, not a typical DPR review.

1 upvote
Barney Britton
By Barney Britton (Sep 4, 2012)

It's a review of a product that's really good, works well, and offers good value compared to the competition. Do you want us to just make up some weaknesses so it sounds less positive? I'm not sure that'd be helpful.

7 upvotes
Scales USA
By Scales USA (Sep 5, 2012)

Its not that I do not appreciate the review, its just that the tone strikes me as being a bit more like a advertisement than the actual technical content. I know its difficult to write a review that suits everyone (from experience), so just consider it as a well intentioned bit of input.

0 upvotes
Gothmoth
By Gothmoth (Sep 4, 2012)

i have the odin.. have sold my PW.. enough info for you?

the odin rocks... PW was good before the TTL triggers came out.
lateyl i had a lot of issues with the TTL PW.

1 upvote
Scales USA
By Scales USA (Sep 4, 2012)

This reads more like sales hype than a review. What types of tests were run? Has it been tested with all flash units, or just one? A test plan that others can reproduce would make it more convincing.

I somehow do not get much of a feeling of confidence in the product from the review.

Keep trying though, something is better than nothing at all.

1 upvote
Gothmoth
By Gothmoth (Sep 4, 2012)

well it sounds like a sales hype because it´s so great...

1 upvote
Kinematic Digit
By Kinematic Digit (Sep 4, 2012)

Great review. I use the Pixel Kings, and was looking at these Odins to control groups as the Pixels don't do that in TTL. Pixel tells me that group control is coming via a Firmware update, but at this point Odins have the advantage here.

0 upvotes
canonluber
By canonluber (Sep 4, 2012)

I recently purchased Pixel Kings, have they come up with new firmware and have you every upgraded the firmware on yours? Odin is was too expensive, especially if you need 4 or more receivers.

0 upvotes
ByronP
By ByronP (Sep 5, 2012)

Waiting for someone to come up with something that goes on my 580's that canon radio device will work with.

0 upvotes
lazerbean
By lazerbean (Sep 5, 2012)

To those who thinks this review reads like an ad: The Odins are as good as the review claims. I've owned the old Pocketwisards with no power control, I've owned the radiopoppers which deserve credit for starting the radio TTL revolution but does not deserve credit for much else as their system (at least v1) sucked, I then purchased the PocketWizard Flex system on the merit of their old system and truth be told will never buy anything from them again. I then purchased the Odins and found myself in near Nirvana. Canon have bested the Odins now with their own proprietary system, but at double the price the Odins are a far better value. What speaks in favour of the new Canon system is greater accuracy on ETTL2, and less boxes to assemble as the flash units already contain the radio circuitry. As for the other poster who claims that the Canon system introduces a lag on the recycle - I have no issues with the Canon flash system on my Canon 5D3 and I am falling in love with it.

2 upvotes
Kinematic Digit
By Kinematic Digit (Sep 9, 2012)

canonluber, they have done two firmware updates since they released it and they are pretty easy to upgrade. However you do need a windows based PC to do it.

0 upvotes
Total comments: 85